parenting

(redirected from Childrearing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Childrearing: parenting

parenting

 [par´ent-ing]
providing a nurturing and constructive environment that promotes growth and development in a child or children; see also attachment.
impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of the primary caregiver to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.
risk for impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

parenting

The activities carried out by a parent–eg, supplying physical sustenance, emotional support instilling moral values, etc. See Bonding; Father 'factor. ', Motherhood. Cf Anaclitic depression, Child abuse.

parenting

(par-en-teng)
1. Caring for and raising a child or children.
2. Producing offspring.

impaired parenting

Inability of the primary caretaker to create an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

impaired parenting, risk for

Risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

surrogate parenting

An alternative method of childbearing for an infertile couple in which the wife is unable to bear a child. The surrogate mother agrees to be artificially inseminated by the husband's sperm and to relinquish the baby to the couple. Another approach is to retrieve eggs from the infertile wife and have them impregnated in vitro by her husband. The fertilized ovum is then implanted in the surrogate mother.
See: fertilization, in vitro; GIFT

parenting

The process of caring for, nurturing and upbringing of a child.

Patient discussion about parenting

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
The December Lamp story is a short article on the delays by the Government's Productivity Commission and was in no way intended to offend or negate the important role fathers play in childrearing.
This collection reflects the wide variance in childrearing and infant care, and includes comparisons of practices in two societies in Nigeria, practices in times of war in Uganda, parental values in various levels of assimilation in indigenous populations, practices of caregivers of HIV-infected Thai children, weaning and work in Nepal for mothers and grandmothers, sex workers and their unplanned infants in Indonesia, beliefs about pregnancy and early life in Malawi and the Igbo of Nigeria, and a number of studies of immigrant women, including Indians, Hmong, Afghans and Vietnamese living in Australia and Bolivians living in Italy.
Hsiung identifies this historical shift with three changes in the "discourse" on children and childhood: a new emphasis on the importance of early childhood education and moral development; a positive view of strong, even punitive, childrearing sanctions; and an insistence that both girls and boys receive the same education in their early years (p.
Surveying popular media, "expert" childrearing manuals, and newspapers and journals published throughout the century, Stearns shows how schooling, physical and emotional vulnerability, and the rise in influence of commercialism became primary concerns for parents.
Shifting childrearing to single mothers: results from 17 Western countries.
The following comparison of childrearing costs in centrally-planned East Germany and market-driven West Germany includes direct, indirect, and time costs of raising children in 1989-1990, just prior to unification.
A particularly fine example is Mary Ellen Lamb's discussion of how The Faerie Queene merges a written classical tradition (marked as masculine) with an oral practice of telling fairy tales (that derives from popular culture and Elizabethan childrearing practices, and is marked as feminine).
The author attempts to explain our obsession with self-fulfillment without any reference to Benjamin Spock or his psychoanalytically-derived ideas of childrearing.
Educational division of the Humanist Society of Friends; encourages population growth control and greater nurturing in childrearing.
This features a "webzine" devoted to the latest buzz on fashion, the arts, childrearing, travel, fine dining and other subjects of special interest to New Yorkers.
Undoubtedly, childrearing does take them out of the workplace for certain periods of time.