parenting

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parenting

 [par´ent-ing]
providing a nurturing and constructive environment that promotes growth and development in a child or children; see also attachment.
impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of the primary caregiver to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.
risk for impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

parenting

The activities carried out by a parent–eg, supplying physical sustenance, emotional support instilling moral values, etc. See Bonding; Father 'factor. ', Motherhood. Cf Anaclitic depression, Child abuse.

parenting

(par-en-teng)
1. Caring for and raising a child or children.
2. Producing offspring.

impaired parenting

Inability of the primary caretaker to create an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

impaired parenting, risk for

Risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

surrogate parenting

An alternative method of childbearing for an infertile couple in which the wife is unable to bear a child. The surrogate mother agrees to be artificially inseminated by the husband's sperm and to relinquish the baby to the couple. Another approach is to retrieve eggs from the infertile wife and have them impregnated in vitro by her husband. The fertilized ovum is then implanted in the surrogate mother.
See: fertilization, in vitro; GIFT

parenting

The process of caring for, nurturing and upbringing of a child.

Patient discussion about parenting

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2003, the Koizumi administration enacted a law obliging local governments and business enterprises to work out action plans to support child-raising and took measures against the dwindling number of children, including allowances for children and nursery schools, and subsidies for enterprises.
To deal with the situation, Inoguchi and others studied a child-raising tax cut said to be effective in France and sought cooperation from Nakagawa and Abe.
After that, either parent can get a child-raising allowance of $430 a month (plus the additional "child money" paid for all children) until the child is 2 years old.
Dealing honestly and effectively with this force is one of the most complex problems in child-raising these days.
It takes a village to raise a child'' is only practical if everybody in the village believes in the same method of child-raising.
David Popenoe of the Council on Families in America suggests that the number of single-mother households could be drastically reduced (and men's wages raised) if wives could be persuaded to stop working during their child-raising years.
In her book, ``It Takes a Village,'' Chelsea's mother acknowledged she was borrowing from the child-raising philosophy expressed by another well-known protective mother, the late Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.