Child-Resistant Packaging


Also found in: Acronyms.
Packaging defined by the Poison Prevention Packaging Act (PPPA) as that which is ‘difficult...for children under age five to open, but not difficult for normal adults to use properly’
References in periodicals archive ?
Our companies are all committed to the idea of child-resistant packaging, and most products already have that, and we are [now] working very quickly to make sure that all products do," said Linda Suydam, who is the president of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), during a conference call with news media.
Our companies are all committed to the idea of child-resistant packaging, and most products already have that, and we are working very quickly to make sure all products do," CHPA President Linda Suydam said during a conference call with news media.
Despite Leslie's Pool Mart's contention that all packaging claims are preempted, we conclude that unless the EPA has specifically considered the packaging methods for a [product like chlorinator tablets], the domain preempted is the narrow area of child-resistant packaging.
Many of these products also are not required to come in child-resistant packaging.
The new child-resistant packaging can help prevent ingestion and is a big step in the right direction.
Cannabis items must also be show the level of marijuana potency and contaminant testing information on child-resistant packaging.
The OLCC, for instance, requires that edible pot products be sold in child-resistant packaging and prohibits packaging that would appeal to children.
According to reports, the Detergent Poisoning and Child Safety Act would direct the US Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) to require safer, child-resistant packaging for liquid detergent packets.
In 2000, EPA banned household uses of chlorpyrifos, with the exception of ant and roach bait in child-resistant packaging.
The Colorado Department of Revenue, the first governing body to work through the hard issues surrounding the safe distribution of MMJ, has well-defined regulations that specifies child-resistant packaging needs to be, “(a) designed or constructed to be significantly difficult for children under five years of age to open… (b) opaque so that the product cannot be seen through the outside packaging; (c) closable for any product intended for more than a single use or containing multiple servings, and (d) labeled properly as required by the R 1000 series.
strawberry, licorice and chocolate) and the optional child-resistant packaging, children are at risk for toxicity that is known to occur with ingestion and dermal exposure to nicotine.
Energizer has also responded to growing concern about the dangers of small children ingesting coin batteries, and has become the first battery manufacturer to voluntarily upgrade to child-resistant packaging on its 20 mm coin lithium batteries.