parenting

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Related to Child raising: Child rearing

parenting

 [par´ent-ing]
providing a nurturing and constructive environment that promotes growth and development in a child or children; see also attachment.
impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of the primary caregiver to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.
risk for impaired parenting a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

parenting

The activities carried out by a parent–eg, supplying physical sustenance, emotional support instilling moral values, etc. See Bonding; Father 'factor. ', Motherhood. Cf Anaclitic depression, Child abuse.

parenting

(par-en-teng)
1. Caring for and raising a child or children.
2. Producing offspring.

impaired parenting

Inability of the primary caretaker to create an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

impaired parenting, risk for

Risk for inability of the primary caretaker to create, maintain, or regain an environment that promotes the optimum growth and development of the child.

surrogate parenting

An alternative method of childbearing for an infertile couple in which the wife is unable to bear a child. The surrogate mother agrees to be artificially inseminated by the husband's sperm and to relinquish the baby to the couple. Another approach is to retrieve eggs from the infertile wife and have them impregnated in vitro by her husband. The fertilized ovum is then implanted in the surrogate mother.
See: fertilization, in vitro; GIFT

parenting

The process of caring for, nurturing and upbringing of a child.

Patient discussion about parenting

Q. I’m with depression. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it? I’m with depression. And I seem to be depressed only when I spend an extended amount of time with family and then I leave them. I don't want to tell this to my parents, so what can I do to cure it?

A. Sounds like you are missing home. Call them up and yack on the phone some. Its part of life to have to be out on your own and everyone usually misses home. Its good you have one to go back to. But you can decide to try and make some roots right where you are. You can't really live your life in two places at once. The advice I was given by a very spiritual person I used to talk to alot was that you have to bloom where you are planted. Make the best of where you are at and quit worrying about how it could be somewhere else. Try and make some friends and get involved in something where you are at. Get put and explore around and see what happens.

Q. Are there any special forums for parents to kids with cancer? I think my sister could really use that kind of support group of people who are going through the exact same thing they never dreamed to be.

A. But how should I tell her to go there? she acts like she doesn't need help. she says she isn't the one who needs treatment and she wouldn't want to waste time and energy on herself now- only on the kid. How do I convince her it's important?

Q. why is it that some women lack parental nutrition?

A. Do you mean breastfeeding? Some women have problem with their nipples, in rare cases the breast tissue isn't developed enough. Sometimes breast surgeries damage the milk ducts. Psychological factors also play a role.

More discussions about parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
Though revolutionary dreams about collective child raising were long past, the courts could also still make rulings in favor of public over private parenting.
In the last paragraph she suggests that this project could begin by noting that women's different role in reproduction does not imply that there are gender differences in affinity to, or capabilities in, child raising.
Herodotus was a witty Roman historian who had about as much to say about the meaning of life as Rod McKuen has about ethics, Julius Caesar about child raising or Shirley MacLaine about thermodynamics.
Sessions will address the diversity among Muslims in different parts of the country; ties of American Muslims abroad; the changing role of Muslim women; concerns of Muslim families with issues of marriage, child raising, food, dress, identify and group loyalties.

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