chief

(redirected from Chiefdoms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

chief

adjective Principal, main, see Chief complaint. noun
1. Chief of service, see there.
2. Chief of staff, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the year, 1929, Twic Ruweng and Panaru Chiefdoms agreed and reverted their area to their previous respective provinces.
For Clifton Crais (1992: 97), raiding was a consequence of expanding internal African and colonial frontiers; the political centralization occurring among powerful chiefdoms along the south-eastern coast was both product and producer of politically motivated raiding, scattering other chiefdoms and disrupting patterns of sedentary agriculture.
paragraph]) There are 43 villages in Gbo and 32 in Selenga, with a combined estimated population in the two chiefdoms of approximately 13,000.
Rountree is the main scholar to have characterized the Potomac River Algonquians in this fashion: "The chiefdoms of the southern shore of the Potomac and of the Eastern Shore were, according to Powhatan's accounts and occasionally to their own, officially part of the empire, but in fact they were a 'fringe' on the new ethnic group that the paramount chief was trying to create" (The Powhatan Indians, 4, 147-48).
They are made up of clusters of chiefdoms or emirates and are ruled by monarchs.
Keywords: Polynesia, Society Islands, marae, chronology, chiefdoms
The Taino organized themselves into regional, district, and village chiefdoms with one principal ruler.
Amerindian chiefdoms gave way to European colonies that have been replaced by nations of various political flavors.
Custalow explains the customs, legal systems and chiefdoms of the Powhatan confederacy in clear, direct terms.
Before delving into the specifics of the author's archaeological research in the Bahamas, in Chapter 4, "Kinship and Kingship," Keegan analyses the structure of Taino chiefdoms and suggests that they were flexible enough in their political and social organization to accept a "stranger king" from the periphery of the Taino culture area as a major cacique on Hispaniola.
Existing interpretations of Amazonia's pre-colonial chiefdoms, frequently reproduced in academic surveys, have helped create a grandiose image of the region's past.
For example, in Engcobo, Thembuland, some thirty chiefdoms were reduced to just four; only two received subsidies so that, in reality, the other two chiefs had been utterly emasculated.