Cheyletiella


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Cheyletiella

a genus of mites in the family Cheyletidae. Cause a mild, scaling dermatitis in dogs and cats, a more severe, pruritic dermatitis, mainly on the back of rabbits, and intensely pruritic vesicles in humans. Host specificity is not certain; in general C. blakei infests cats, C. parasitovorax infests rabbits and hares, and C. yasguri infests dogs.
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An adult Cheyletiella mite. By permission from Kummel BA, Color Atlas of Small Animal Dermatology, Mosby, 1989
References in periodicals archive ?
Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Eimeria stiedae, Eimeria magna, Eimeria intestinalis, Eimeria irresidua, Eimeria flavescens, Eimeria piriformis, Toxoplasma gondii, Passalurus ambiguous, other helminths, parainfluenza virus 1, parainfluenza virus 2, reovirus, Psoroptes cuniculi, Cheyletiella parasitovorax, Leporacarus gibbus, and Dermatomycosis spp.
More often than not the parasite cheyletiella (walking dandruff) is the cause.
If Cheyletiella is diagnosed, it can usually be treated with medication.
Cheyletiellosis (cheyletiella dermatitis) is a dermatitis caused by cheyletiella mites that are seen more commonly in cats, dogs and rabbits all over the world.
She still has some but thankfully, it's plain old dander and not the Cheyletiella mite - aka 'walking dandruff' - that, being zoonotic, happily migrates to you and me.
The mite cheyletiella often causes hair to be lost in tufts with a noticeable accumulation of skin flakes at their base.
The mite cheyletiella often causes hair to be lost in tufts, with a noticeable accumulation of skin flakes at their base.
Cheyletiella are mites that live on top of the surface of the skin and cause itchiness and scaliness.
AIT could be a tiny, white mite called Cheyletiella, which is sometimes described as "walking dandruff".
Walking dandruff" is the name commonly given to infestation of dogs, cats, and rabbits by the tiny mite of the genus Cheyletiella.
We can, however, cite examples of other infections, such as Cheyletiella blakei dermatitis in a woman who shared her bed with a recently acquired cat (4).
A case of Cheyletiella blakei infection was reported in a 76-year-old woman with pruritic eruption of vesicles and bullous lesions on her trunk and arms (35).