chemoreception

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che·mo·re·cep·tion

(kē'mō-rē-sep'shun),
The ability to perceive chemicals in the environment that are odorants or tastants.
Synonym(s): chemosensation

chemoreception

(kē′mō-rĭ-sĕp′shən, kĕm′ō-)
n.
The physiological response of a sense organ to a chemical stimulus.

che′mo·re·cep′tive adj.
che′mo·re′cep·tiv′i·ty (-rē′sĕp-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

che·mo·re·cep·tion

(kē'mō-rĕ-sep'shŭn)
The ability to perceive chemicals in the environment that are odorants or tastants.
Synonym(s): chemosensation.

chemoreception

the physiological reception of chemical stimuli.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This poster will focus the structural and selectivity aspects of this new macrocyclic chemosensors for anions.
Under optimized conditions, the response of chemosensor 6 was linearly proportional to the concentration of Cr2O72- in a range from (10-100 uM) with determination coefficient of 0.
Zhu, A Dual-Function Colorimetric Chemosensor for Thiols and Transition Metal Ions Based on ICT Mechanism, Tet.
The nine contributions, from a variety of international professionals and researchers, cover a wide variety of subjects, including spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation, circularly polarized luminescence, luminescent bioimaging with lanthanide complexes, lanthanide ion complexes as chemosensors, heterometallic complexes containing lanthanides, and many others.
olfactory chemosensors of crustaceans) number in 4 protandric simultaneous hermaphroditic shrimp species in the genus Lysmata with 2 social systems pair living (Lysmata amboinensis and Lysmata pederseni) and group living (Lysmata boggessi and Lysmata wurdemanni)--from male phase to euhermaphrodite phase were examined.
Kaner, "Carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite nanofibers: Facile synthesis and chemosensors," Nano Letters, Vol.
The goal is to teach novices in the field the general thought processes, steps, and analysis in creating chemosensors that are both academically novel and practically useful.
Animals receive biochemical information about chemical stimuli through chemosensors that respond to specific molecules in the environment.
They cover rare earth complexes with carboxylic acids, polyaminopolycarboxylic acids, and amino acids; nitrogen-based rare earth complexes; rare earth polyoxometalate complexes; the coordination chemistry of rare earth alkoxides, aryloxides, and hydroxides; rare earth metals trapped inside fullerenes: endohedral metallofullerenes; the organometallic chemistry of the lanthanide metals; lanthanide-based magnetic molecular materials; gadolinium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for diagnosis; electroluminescence based on lanthanide complexes; near-infrared luminescence from lanthanide (III) complexes; and luminescent rare earth complexes as chemosensors and bioimaging probes.
Compared with many current optical chemosensors for lead (II), this sensor is rapid, cost-effective and enzyme-free.
By reason of this we were focused on gaseous chemosensors and detecting elements of such basic physical quantities like humidity, temperature and pressure.
She added: "The present discovery that chemosensors in the amygdala are involved in generating fear responses to a variety of aversive stimuli suggests that a system that evolved to generate behavior to defend against suffocation was subsequently adapted to deal with both innate and learned threats in the external environment