inorganic chemistry

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chemistry

 [kem´is-tre]
the science that treats of the elements and atomic relations of matter, and of the various compounds of the elements.
colloid chemistry chemistry dealing with the nature and composition of colloids.
inorganic chemistry the branch of chemistry dealing with compounds that do not contain carbon-carbon bonds (inorganic compounds).
organic chemistry the branch of chemistry dealing with organic compounds, those characterized by carbon-carbon bonds, i.e., all compounds containing carbon except oxides of carbon, carbides, and carbonates.

in·or·gan·ic chem·is·try

the science concerned with compounds not involving carbon-containing molecules.

inorganic chemistry

the study of the properties and reactions of all chemical elements and compounds other than hydrocarbons or their derivatives.

in·or·gan·ic che·mis·try

(in'ōr-gan'ik kem'is-trē)
The science concerned with compounds not involving carbon-containing molecules.

inorganic chemistry (in·ōr·gaˑ·nik keˑ·m·strē),

n the chemistry of all inorganic compounds (i.e., those that do not contain carbon).

chemistry

the science that treats of the elements and atomic relations of matter, and of the various compounds of the elements.

colloid chemistry
chemistry dealing with the nature and composition of colloids.
inorganic chemistry
the branch of chemistry dealing with inorganic compounds.
organic chemistry
the branch of chemistry dealing with organic compounds, those characterized by carbon-carbon bonds, i.e. all compounds containing carbon except oxides of carbon, carbides and carbonates.

inorganic

1. having no organs.
2. not of organic origin.

inorganic chemistry
that branch of chemistry which deals with inorganic compounds, those not containing carbon and also carbides, oxides of carbon, and carbonates.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organizers would like to acknowledge the numerous sponsors that made this event possible, including McMaster University, the McMaster Faculty of Science, the McMaster Chemistry Department, the Canadian Society for Chemistry, the CIC (including the Chemical Education Trust Fund and the following divisions: Organic Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Biological/Medicinal Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, and Environment), the Canadian Council of University Chairs of Chemistry, and the Council of Chemistry Department Chairs of Ontario Universities.