fractionation

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fractionation

 [frak″shun-a´shun]
1. in radiology, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses given at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frak'shŭn-ā'shŭn),
1. To separate components of a mixture.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, in order to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.

fractionation

/frac·tion·a·tion/ (frak″shun-a´shun)
1. in radiology, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses administered at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.

fractionation

(frăk′shə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The process of dividing or separating into parts; breaking up.
2. The division of a total therapeutic dose of radiation into small doses to be administered over a period of days or weeks.
3. The separation of a chemical compound into components, as by distillation.

fractionation

[frak′shənā′shən]
Etymology: L, frangere, to break
1 (in neurology) a mechanism within the neural arch of the vertebrae whereby only a portion of the efferent nerves innervating a muscle reacts to a stimulus, even when the reflex requirement is maximal, so that a reserve of neurons remains to respond to additional stimuli. Through this phenomenon muscle tension is maintained.
2 (in chemistry) the separation of a substance into its basic constituents by using such procedures as fractional distillation or crystallization.
3 (in bacteriology) the process of isolating a pure culture by successive culturing of a small portion of a colony of bacteria.
4 (in histology) the process of isolating the different components of living cells by centrifugation.
5 (in radiology) the process of administering a dose of radiation in smaller units over time to minimize tissue damage rather than in a single large dose. also called dose fractionation.

fractionation

Radiation oncology The parceling of a dose of radiation over time. See Accelerated fractionation, Hyperfractionation, Radiation therpy.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.

Fractionation

A laboratory test or process in which blood or another fluid is broken down into its components. Fractionation can be used to assess the proportions of the different types of cholesterol in a blood sample.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage.

fractionation

(frak´shənā´shən),
n 1. the separation of a substance into its basic constituents.
2. the process of isolating a pure culture by sucessive culturing of a small portion of a colony of bacteria.
3. the process of isolating different components of living cells by centrifugation.
4. the process of administering a dose of radiation in smaller units over time to minimize tissue damage.

fractionation

1. in radiotherapy, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses given at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Escudey M, Galindo G, Foerster JE, Briceno M, Diaz P, Chang AC (2001) Chemical fractionation of phosphorus of volcanic ash-derived soils in Chile.
Barbanti A, Bergamini MC, Frascari F, Miserocchi S, Rosso G (1994) Critical aspects of sedimentary phosphorous chemical fractionation.
Chemical fractionation techniques such as those described by McLaren and Crawford (1973) and Shuman (1985) have been used extensively in attempts to examine the nature and amounts of various trace elements, including Co in soils (Jarvis 1984b; McLaren et al.