Charters


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Char·ters

(char'tĕrz), Avoid the incorrect forms Charter and Charter's.
W.J., U.S. dentist. See: Charters method.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said the success of charters in the Los Angeles Unified School District is fueling its growth, with the district approving more than 100 charters -- the most of any district in the nation -- and 30 more slated to open this fall.
It's also troubling that the negative effect of charters that they report depends upon charter age.
IT HAS NOW BEEN NEARLY 15 years since the first public policy debates emerged surrounding the invention of charter colleges or universities.
We recognize, however, that, while we debate, charter schools are gaining in popularity and religious organizations are already actively involved in establishing their own charters.
While some yachts are now being built with corporate functions in mind, most charters are reserved for family and friends because there's something for everyone.
Some parents have had to confront curricula that turn out to be pervasively religious, and others have been caught off guard by abrupt closings of financially drained charters, leaving them desperately scrambling to find other schools to enroll their children.
Most states have a few charters that never should have been allowed to start and a few more that cannot sustain the pace.
The director of an ultra-conservative San Francisco think tank asked why he was so worried about faith-based charters being publicly accountable.
This has in some cases forced many charter schools to close or turn away students -- many charters have waiting lists of up to thousands of students that cannot be accommodated due to ongoing facilities constraints.
Ten years into the charter school movement, founders of successful charters have begun replicating their schools in the communities they serve.
Despite the rapid growth in the number of charter schools in the state, the 12,000 students enrolled in charters in 1999-2000 represented just 1 percent of North Carolina's 1.