Charles

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Related to Charles VII: Louis XI, Charles VIII

Charles

(shahrl),
Jacques, French physicist, 1746-1823. See: Charles law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Joan asked the Duke point blank if she could have Rene and some men-at-arms as an escort to France and Charles VII.
They told her to seek out the dauphin, as Charles VII was referred to, and to persuade him to let her lead his armies against the English at Orleans, where she would be victorious.
That was because Harris played France's dauphin, the heir to the throne, who later became King Charles VII with the help of the Maid of Orleans.
20) Del Serra, 75; Natali, 64; Di Teodoro, 50, 67, 69; on the green cloth of honor behind Julius II in Raphael's painting, a detail apparently borrowed from Jean Fouquet's portraits of Charles VII and of Eugenius IV, see Partridge and Starn, 10-11, 13.
The weak-kneed, uncrowned Valois king, Charles VII, the dauphin, cowered in his castle at Chinon.
Legend has it that King Charles VII of France had Joan's suit made for her at a cost of 100 war horses.
Les notaires et secritaires du roi sous les regnes tie Louis XI, Charles VII et Louis XII (1461 - 1515).
He warmly welcomed his cousin Charles VII to the cathedral, reaffirming the see's new obedience to the French throne and symbolizing the degree to which Normandy was once again claimed for the French kings.
Sent on a diplomatic mission to Roussillon by Louis XI, he so infuriated this irascible monarch that he was never able to return to Lisieux, and ended his days in Utrecht, refining his histories of Charles VII, and of the infamous son who had driven him from his homeland and his episcopal see.
He cites a recent example of the latter: "In the time of our fathers, Charles VII, King of France, in the war he made against the English, said that he took counsel with a girl sent by God, who was called everywhere the Maid of France; and this was the cause of his victory.
Major maintains that the French monarchy which emerged from the Hundred Years War was weak and therefore subsequently reconstituted by Charles VII.
In France, he dazzled the court of Charles VII with displays of knightly swordsmanship, as well as painting, and both the playing and making of musical instruments.