Charles

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Charles

(shahrl),
Jacques, French physicist, 1746-1823. See: Charles law.
References in periodicals archive ?
The final chapter, " The Presentation of the Emperor," deals with visual representations of Charles V, which cast him variously as the Defender of the Faith, a crusader, and the lancewielding miles Christi.
19) Several compositions in the Grandes chroniques' frontispiece resemble images from the life of Saint Louis in another manuscript in Charles' library, Queen Jeanne d'Evreux's book of hours (not on display at the Getty exhibition), which Jeanne, the last Capetian queen, bequeathed to Charles V when she died in 1371.
Nevertheless, the Burgundian example of a large and relatively well-endowed body of musicians exerted great influence throughout the period, particularly those rulers most immediately under the Burgundian spell like Charles V (1526-1566) and Philip II (1566-1598).
1365-1430) transformed her personal memories of King Charles V into an enduring form of national memory by allying her 1404 biography of Charles with official French history.
Alistair Dixon's group La Chapelle Du Roi stakes its claim simultaneously to Tallis and, more unusually, the Burgundian and Spanish Courts of Charles V, father of Philip II of Spain.
After the succession of the future Emperor Charles v to the thrones of both Castille and Aragon, in 1516, both of these cities were in the possession of the House of Austria.
It will no doubt become indispensable to scholars of Netherlandish music and culture, particularly the Burgundian-Habsburg courts of Philip the Fair, Marguerite of Austria, and Charles V.
Unfortunately, the introductory biography of Charles V by William Maltby briefly refers to only two of the publications from the commemorations' various activities.
The brief introduction is followed by one chapter chronicling the diplomatic highs and lows of Spain's ambassadors in Venice during this period, while the next three chapters do the same for the Spanish ambassadors in Rome under Charles V, during the first half of Philip II's reign up to the collapse of the Holy League in 1573, and during the second half of Philip's reign.
The victory of Charles V outside Leipzig at Muhlberg over the forces of his rebellious Protestant princes, marked a high-point for the Habsburg emperor in his life-long attempt to maintain his authority in Germany as a loyal Catholic ruler in the face of the divisions and challenges that the Reformation posed to his authority.
The subject of both collections is the incredible career of Charles V, whose improbable and incoherent dynastic inheritance drew him into every possible political and religious situation between 1520 and 1556.
Apart from the transient shows of cultural magnificence that Francis initiated -- such as the extravagance of the Field of the Cloth of Gold at which he attempted to bind Henry VIII into an alliance against the Emperor Charles V in June 1520 -- he left permanent monuments in stone, chateaux in the Loire Valley at Blois, Chambord and Amboise and his great palace south of Paris at Fontainebleau, which became a showcase for his artistic patronage.