Charak Samhita

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Charak Samhita

Ayurvedic medicine
A sacred scripture of India written over 2000 years ago, which contains a comprehensive treatise delineating the eight major branches of human healthcare, providing details on psychology, toxicology, rejuvenation, virilisation and others.
References in periodicals archive ?
The medicinal use of turmeric is mentioned even among the Vedas and elaborated in classical Ayurvedic texts like the Charaka Samhita.
Approximately, 3000 years ago, excerpts from the Vedas relevant to health and medicine were collected into a series of written, focused compendia: the Charaka Samhita and the Sushrut Samhita.
Boswellia gum has been mentioned in the ancient Ayurvedic texts Sushrita Samhita and Charaka Samhita (Kulkarni et al, 1991).
The Charaka Samhita lists the characteristics of Pitta dosha as hot and a little unctuous; sharp, burning; liquid and acidic; always flowing in an unbounded manner; pungent and sharp.
The Charaka Samhita defines Kapha dosha as heavy (both water and earth are heavy elements); cold; soft; unctuous, offering lubrication; sweet; stable, offering immunity; and slippery.
Amalaka Rasayana (3), a classical preparation from the text Charaka Samhita, made from Amalaka (Phyllanthus emblica), Kumkuma kesara (Crocus sativa), Ela (Ellateria cardamomum) has been known to have effects of anti-ageing and is used extensively in Kerala, India.
The Charaka samhita provides an elaborate code of conduct, stressing that the medical profession has to be motivated by compassion for living beings; (10) thus, '.
The exposition from Charaka Samhita presents Bharatavarshiya version of theory and theorization.
ammi is one of the most famous medicinal plants in the treatment of a large number of human ailments being mentioned in Ayurveda, Sushrita Samhita and Charaka Samhita [18].
The Greek, Galen, and the Jew, Maimonides, expected, actually demanded, high moral character of healers, but only India's Charaka Samhita st Century AD) attributed moral as well as scientific authority to the healer.
The transcripts of classical traditional medicine systems in India include Rigveda, Atherveda, Charaka Samhita and Sushruta Samhita.
It is mentioned in the Ayurvedic text Charaka Samhita where it is called Kavala or Gandusha, and is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases ranging from headache, migraine to diabetes and asthma.