Cheyne-Stokes respiration

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Cheyne-Stokes respiration

 [chān stōks]
breathing characterized by rhythmic waxing and waning of the depth of respiration; the patient breathes deeply for a short time and then breathes very slightly or stops breathing altogether. The pattern occurs over and over, every 45 seconds to 3 minutes. Periodic breathing of this type is caused by disease affecting the respiratory centers, usually heart failure or brain damage.

Cheyne-Stokes res·pi·ra·tion

(chān stōks), Avoid the malapropism change-strokes and the misspellings Stoke and Stoke's.
The pattern of breathing with gradual increase in depth and sometimes in rate to a maximum, followed by a decrease resulting in apnea; the cycles ordinarily are 30 seconds to 2 minutes in duration, with 5-30 seconds of apnea; seen with bilateral deep cerebral hemispheric lesions, with metabolic encephalopathy, and, characteristically, in coma from affection of the nervous centers of respiration.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration

(chān′stōks′, chā′nē-stōks′)
n.
An abnormal type of breathing seen especially in comatose patients, characterized by alternating periods of shallow and deep breathing.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR)

Etymology: John Cheyne; William Stokes, Irish physician, 1804-1878; L, respirare to breathe
an abnormal pattern of respiration, characterized by alternating periods of apnea and deep, rapid breathing. The respiratory cycle begins with slow, shallow breaths that gradually become abnormally rapid and deep. Breathing gradually becomes slower and shallower and is followed by 10 to 20 seconds of apnea before the cycle is repeated. Each episode may last from 45 seconds to 3 minutes. Underlying CSR is a complex alteration in the functioning of the respiratory center in the brain, caused by dysfunction of the diencephalon or by bilateral hemispheric lesions. The respiratory center may have a reduced sensitivity to the concentrations of blood gases, as is seen in cerebrovascular disease, in tumors of the brainstem, and in severe head injury. CSR may be triggered by changes in blood chemical processes, especially in elderly patients with degenerative arterial disease or respiratory diseases, such as bronchopneumonia. In an otherwise healthy person, CSR may be caused by hyperventilation, exposure to high altitudes, or an overdose of a narcotic or hypnotic drug. CSR occurs more frequently during sleep. Also called agonal respiration, periodic breathing. Compare Biot's respiration.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration

A clinical form of recurrent apnoea seen in patients with neurologic and heart disease, which is characterised by regular volleys of apnoea followed by regular “crescendo-decrescendo” fluctuations in respiratory rate and tidal volume (hypoventilation or hyperventilation).

Triggers
Increased arterial PCO2, sedatives, opiates. It is more common during sleep and at high altitudes, and seen in comas secondary to cerebrovascular accidents and severe neurologic insults.

Cheyne-Stokes res·pi·rat·ion

(chān stōks res'pir-ā'shŭn)
The pattern of breathing with gradual increase in depth and sometimes in rate to a maximum, followed by a decrease resulting in apnea; the cycles ordinarily are 30 seconds to 2 minutes in duration, with 5 to 30 seconds of apnea; seen with bilateral deep febrile hemispheric lesions, with metabolic encephalopathy, and, characteristically, in coma from disorders of the nervous centers of respiration.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration

Periods of very shallow, almost imperceptible, breathing alternating with periods of deep breathing. This sequence often precedes death (John Cheyne, 1777–1836, Scottish physician; and William Stokes, 1804–78, Irish physician).

Cheyne,

John, Scottish physician, 1777-1836.
Cheyne nystagmus
Cheyne-Stokes breathing - Synonym(s): Cheyne-Stokes respiration
Cheyne-Stokes psychosis - a mental state characterized by anxiety and restlessness, accompanying Cheyne-Stokes respiration.
Cheyne-Stokes respiration - the pattern of breathing characteristically seen in coma. Synonym(s): Cheyne-Stokes breathing

Stokes,

William, Irish physician, 1804-1878.
Adams-Stokes disease - Synonym(s): Adams-Stokes syndrome
Adams-Stokes syncope - see under Adams, Robert
Adams-Stokes syndrome - see under Adams, Robert
Cheyne-Stokes breathing - Synonym(s): Cheyne-Stokes respiration
Cheyne-Stokes psychosis - see under Cheyne
Cheyne-Stokes respiration - see under Cheyne
Morgagni-Adams-Stokes syndrome - Synonym(s): Adams-Stokes syndrome
Stokes law - a muscle lying above an inflamed mucous or serous membrane is frequently the seat of paralysis.
Stokes-Adams disease - Synonym(s): Adams-Stokes syndrome
Stokes-Adams syndrome - Synonym(s): Adams-Stokes syndrome

Cheyne-Stokes respiration,

n atypical pattern of breathing where the individual alternates between deep, rapid breathing and apnea.

Cheyne-Stokes res·pi·rat·ion

(chān stōks res'pir-ā'shŭn)
Pattern of breathing with gradual increase in depth and sometimes in rate to a maximum, followed by a decrease resulting in apnea.

Cheyne-Stokes respiration

breathing characterized by rhythmic waxing and waning of the depth of respiration; the patient breathes deeply for a short time and then breathes very slightly or stops breathing altogether. The pattern occurs over and over again every 45 seconds to 3 minutes. Periodic breathing of this type is caused by disease affecting the respiratory centers.