Chaikoff

Chai·koff

(shī'kof),
Israel Lyon, Polish-Canadian physician, 1902-1966. See: Wolff-Chaikoff block, Wolff-Chaikoff effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Wolff Chaikoff effect can occur, some may develop persistent hypo- or hyperthyroidism.
The intent of Wolff and Chaikoff was to determine the effects of inorganic nonradioactive iodine on the thyroid gland in rats.
This is believed to be due partly to the escape from the Wolff-Chaikoff effect (acute inhibition of iodine organification) that is seen within days of exposure to excess iodide (Wolff and Chaikoff 1948).
The first nail in the iodine coffin was the publication by Wolff and Chaikoff from UC Berkley in 1948, (11) describing their findings in rats administered iodide in increasing amounts by intraperitoneal injection.
Whereas the first wave of medical iodophobia was initiated in 1910 by the pen of one man, Swiss surgeon, Nobel laureate, Professor Theodore Kocher and lasted some 15 years (1910-1925), (1) the second wave of medical iodophobia initiated in 1948 by the pen of two men, Wolff and Chaikoff, is alive and well even after some 60 years of existence.
3) Wolff and Chaikoff acknowledged the excellent and dramatic results achieved consistently with the use of Lugol solution in hyperthyroidism.
Therefore, in hyperthyroidism, iodine/iodide in Lugol at a daily dose of 90 mg induced a physiological trend toward normalization of thyroid function, a beneficial effect, not the fictitious W-C effect as proposed by Wolff and Chaikoff.
The first nail in the iodine coffin was the publication by Wolff and Chaikoff from UC Berkley in 1948, (3) describing their finding in rats administered iodide in increasing amounts by intraperitoneal injection.
In the next issue of this journal, this author discusses the Wolff-Chaikoff effect and presents evidence that the data reported in the rats by Wolff and Chaikoff (3) did not justify the interpretation of these data as applied to rats.
27) The first paragraph of Stanley's manuscript stated the objective, "The interest of thyroidologists was recently aroused by the demonstration by Wolff and Chaikoff (1) that, with levels of serum iodide higher than 20 to 30 micrograms per cent, organic binding of iodine in the rat thyroid was inhibited.