Chagas disease


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South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include dogs, armadillos, rodents, and other domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.

South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

(sowth ă-mer'i-kăn trī-pan'ō-sŏ-mī'ă-sis)
Disease caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by some species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.
Synonym(s): Chagas disease, Chagas-Cruz disease, Cruz trypanosomiasis.

Chagas disease

(shag'as)
[Carlos Ribeiro Justiniano Chagas, Brazilian physician, 1879–1934]
A bloodborne disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the biting of a reduviid bug. It is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial edema. Chronic cases may be mild or asymptomatic, or may be accompanied by myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, megaesophagus, megacolon, or death.

Etiology

Chagas disease may be transmitted from person-to-person by needlestick injury, transfusion, organ donation, or during childbirth.

Synonym: American trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis See: Trypanosoma cruzi

Chagas,

Carlos J.R., Brazilian physician and parasitologist, 1879-1934.
Chagas disease - parasitic infection transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. Synonym(s): Chagas-Cruz disease; Chagas-Mazza disease; Cruz trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis
Chagas-Cruz disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease

Mazza,

Salvador, Argentinian physician, 1886-1946.
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Sheba Meymandi at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar speaks about the nation's first Chagas disease clinic.
Drugs used to treat Chagas disease in humans have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and are available in the United States only through investigational protocols.
McKerrow is also working on a project to address Chagas disease, which is a leading cause of heart failure throughout Mesoamerica.
NTDs designated by the WHO for control or elimination: Buruli Ulcer, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), Cysticercosis/Taeniasis, Dengue/Severe dengue, Dracunculiasis (guinea-worm disease), Echinococcosis, Fascioliasis, Human African trypanosomiasis, Leishmaniasis, Leprosy, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Rabies, Schistosomiasis, Soil transmitted helminthiasis, Trachoma, Yaws)
Chagas disease is spread mainly by blood--sucking insects infected with T.
Two cases of transfusion-transmitted acute Chagas disease have been documented in the United States: one in Los Angeles and one in New York City.
Symptoms of Chagas disease include fever, fatigue, body aches, headache, a rash where the parasite entered the body and swelling around the eyelids.
We report a patient with congenital Chagas disease in Japan.
Under the terms of the agreement, DNDi shall retain sole responsibility for the clinical development to assess the safety and efficacy of E1224, which is a pro-drug of ravuconazole, in patients with Chagas disease within endemic countries.
This buffering effect conferred by biodiversity may also apply to other human infectious diseases such as West Nile encephalitis, cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, African trypanosomiasis, and Chagas disease (Ostfeld and Keesing 2000b).
Recent research by two scientific teams offers new hope for curing Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, parasitic diseases that kill millions each year and for which no effective drugs exist.
NEW YORK & GENEVA -- Pfizer Inc and Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) have signed an agreement that is designed to facilitate advancements in the battle against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and Chagas disease, which afflict vulnerable populations in the developing world.