Chagas disease


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South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include dogs, armadillos, rodents, and other domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.

South A·mer·i·can try·pan·o·so·mi·a·sis

(sowth ă-mer'i-kăn trī-pan'ō-sŏ-mī'ă-sis)
Disease caused by Trypanosoma (or Schizotrypanum) cruzi and transmitted by some species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. In its acute form, it is seen most frequently in young children, with swelling of the skin at the site of entry, most often the face, and regional lymph node enlargement; in its chronic form it can assume several aspects, commonly cardiomyopathy, but megacolon and megaesophagus also occur; natural reservoirs include domestic, domiciliated, and wild mammals.
Synonym(s): Chagas disease, Chagas-Cruz disease, Cruz trypanosomiasis.

Chagas disease

(shag'as)
[Carlos Ribeiro Justiniano Chagas, Brazilian physician, 1879–1934]
A bloodborne disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by the biting of a reduviid bug. It is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial edema. Chronic cases may be mild or asymptomatic, or may be accompanied by myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, megaesophagus, megacolon, or death.

Etiology

Chagas disease may be transmitted from person-to-person by needlestick injury, transfusion, organ donation, or during childbirth.

Synonym: American trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis See: Trypanosoma cruzi

Chagas,

Carlos J.R., Brazilian physician and parasitologist, 1879-1934.
Chagas disease - parasitic infection transmitted by certain species of reduviid (triatomine) bugs. Synonym(s): Chagas-Cruz disease; Chagas-Mazza disease; Cruz trypanosomiasis; South American trypanosomiasis
Chagas-Cruz disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease

Mazza,

Salvador, Argentinian physician, 1886-1946.
Chagas-Mazza disease - Synonym(s): Chagas disease
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the agreement, Chemo Group will continue working with Exeltis, Mundo Sano and Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) to overcome barriers to treatment of Chagas disease.
Evaluation and treatment of Chagas disease in the United States: a systematic review.
Historically, despite free services and the availability of medication, prescription of etiological treatment for Chagas disease has been low, especially in the first level of care (9, 10).
Serological tests for Chagas disease in southern Brazil were requested at the first medical appointment for only 3.
The patient was not aware of any relatives having Chagas disease, although he was adopted at a young age and had no knowledge of his biological mother.
Surveillance on the part of the population in looking out for the Chagas disease is of paramount importance.
Prophylaxis against Chagas disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation.
A review of the Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) products under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
Currently, there are only two treatments for Chagas disease available: nifurtimox and benznidazole.
Accurate real-time PCR strategy for monitoring bloodstream parasitic loads in chagas disease patients.
This first project for the treatment of Chagas disease has also been awarded a grant for partial funding by the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund), an international nonprofit organization (NPO) that aims to promote the discovery of new health technologies from Japan for eliminating infectious diseases prevalent in developing countries.