Catagonus wagneri

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Catagonus wagneri

Chacoan peccary.
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In the dry Chaco thornbush of Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina, one finds the Chacoan peccary the largest peccary known and the only one considered to be endangered.
White-lipped peccaries are much larger, weighing up to 85 pounds, and the Chacoan peccary are larger still, weighing up to perhaps 95 pounds.
Acari: Ixodidae), a parasite of the Chacoan peccary Catagonus wagneri (Rusconi) (Artiodactyla: Tayassuidae) in Argentina.
Farther south, throughout Central and South America, additional varieties of the javelina can be found including the White-Lipped Peccary and the rarer Chacoan Peccary, a protected larger variety with a habitat limited to Northern Argentina, Southeast Bolivia and Western Paraguay, where they overlap with the introduced European pigs.
The same pattern has been observed in the Chaco region for chacoan peccary (Sowls 1997).
A 4-day-old Chacoan peccary infant, a critically endangered species, explores its habitat with its mother at the San Diego Zoo.
And the Chacoan peccary tips the scale at nearly 100 pounds.
Once thought extinct, the endangered Chacoan peccary probably numbers only 5,000.
It took the scientific community a long time to find out what the local people knew all along," says John Mayer, a wildlife biologist with Westinghouse in the United States who participated as a graduate student in a Chacoan peccary research project in Paraguay that rediscovered the animals in the 1970s.
Habitat loss, a restricted range, and overhunting have caused Chacoan peccary numbers to plummet.
In addition to the Chacoan peccary, there is the white-lipped peccary, which lives mostly in dense rain forests from southern Mexico to northern Argentina, and the collared peccary, or javelina, which ranges from northern Argentina and Uruguay to the U.
These are the two varieties that are currently huntable, but a third, the Chacoan peccary, is found in the dry forest or "chaco" bush of Bolivia and Paraguay and possibly northern Argentina.