cetraria


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ce·tra·ri·a

(sē-trā'rē-ă),
The dried plant, Cetraria islandica (family Parmeliaceae), a lichen, not a moss, used as a demulcent and as a folk remedy for bronchitis.
Synonym(s): Iceland moss
[L. caetra, a short Spanish shield (from shape of the apothecia)]
References in periodicals archive ?
One example is the study of Cetraria islandica complex: by a careful examination of over 3000 specimens, Kristinsson (1969) found that this group contained both fumarprotocetraric acid-producing and -deficient variants revealed by p-phenylenediamine spot testing, and that such chemotypes had no correlations with morphology and geography.
The present work focuses for the first time on the possible neuroprotective and anticancer properties of the methanol extracts from two Parmeliaceae lichens from the cetraroid clade: Cetraria islandica and Vulpicida canadensis.
Cetraria nivalis (center photo), shown under a thin layer of ice is able to reproduce vegetatively by fragmentation of its branches and these broken parts can take "root" by means of rhizoids or other fixing organs.
Immunologically active (1 [right arrow] 3)-(1 [right arrow] 4)-[alpha]-D-glucan from Cetraria islandica.
7%), Tomenthypynum nitens (3%), and unidentified species (83%) Lichens Cetraria spp.
Biogeography and ecology of Cetraria aculeata, a widely distributed lichen with a bipolar distribution.
The lichen-heath was dominated by Cetraria nivalis, Cetraria cucullata, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Bryoria nitidula.
Population structure of mycobionts and photobionts of the widespread lichen Cetraria aculeata.
Nonvascular genera in this group include Cetraria, Cladina, Cladonia, Peltigera, Hylocomium, and Dicranum, which dominated the ground cover prior to the wildfire (Table 2).
Antitumor activities on sarcoma-180 of the polysaccharide preparations from Gyrophora esculenta miyoshi, Cetraria islandica (L.