Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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Saccharomyces boulardii

a yeast species widely prescribed for treatment of diarrhea. Molecular typing shows it to be nearly identical, genetically, to S. cerevisiae; however it is metabolically and physiologically different.
See also: Saccharomyces.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae

A yeast used in recombinant DNA technology to manufacture proteins for medical use, e.g., in vaccine components.
See also: Saccharomyces
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of live yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on fermentation parameters and microbial populations of rumen, total tract digestibility of diet nutrients and on the in situ degradability of alfalfa hay in Iranian Chall sheep.
Patients supplemented with either 500 mg of Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived-peptides or placebo 30 minutes before breakfast and dinner--but without mandated changes to their personal diet and exercise habits.
The presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in production of organic acids, ethanol and C[O.
Additionally, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was provided by Professor Angelica Kundson (Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Colombia).
Antibody to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers' yeast) in Crohn's disease.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic and antinociceptive potential of a commercially available beta-glucan isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Kinetics of ethanol production by a thermotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a microprocessor controlled bioreactor.
cerevisiae yeasts, housed at the Peoria center's world-renowned collection of microbes.
Relatedness of medically important strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as revealed by phylogenetics and metabolomics.
Grape must is fermented to ethanol and flavour compounds by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Adam's discovery about the genomics of the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism used by scientists to model more complex life systems, was published in April 2009 and came fourth in the magazine's poll.
Their topics include green fluorescent protein-based reporter cell lines for the dynamic profiling of transcription factor and kinase activation, comparing algorithms for analyzing fluorescent microscopy images and computation of transcription factor profiles, genome-scale analysis of metabolic networks, determining metabolic production capabilities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using dynamic flux balance analysis, reverse engineering biological networks, and the transcriptome analysis of regulatory networks.