contusion

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contusion

 [kon-too´zhun]
injury to tissues with skin discoloration and without breakage of skin; called also bruise. Blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling, and tenderness, and the discoloration is the result of blood seepage just under the skin. Most heal without special treatment, but cold compresses may reduce bleeding if applied immediately after the injury, and thus may reduce swelling, discoloration, and pain.

If a contusion is unusually severe, the injured part should be rested and slightly elevated; later application of heat may hasten absorption of blood. Serious complications may develop in some cases. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but occasionally blood clotted in the area may form a cyst or may calcify and require surgical treatment. Contusions may also be complicated by infection.
cerebral contusion contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurologic defects or epilepsy. (See also cranial hematoma.)

con·tu·sion

(kon-tū'zhŭn),
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
See also: bruise.
[L. contusio, a bruising]

contusion

/con·tu·sion/ (kon-too´zhun) bruise; an injury of a part without a break in the skin.
contrecoup contusion  one resulting from a blow on one side of the head with damage to the cerebral hemisphere on the opposite side by transmitted force.

contusion

(kən-to͞o′zhən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
An injury in which the skin is not broken; a bruise.

contusion

[kənt(y)o̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, contundere, to bruise
an injury that does not disrupt the integrity of the skin, caused by a blow to the body and characterized by swelling, discoloration, and pain. The immediate application of cold may limit the development of a contusion. Also called bruise. Compare ecchymosis.
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Contusion

contusion

Dermatology A bruise, an injury without a break in the skin, in which subcutaneous blood vessels rupture, resulting in ecchymotic patches, often due to a blow from a blunt object. See Brain contusion, Cerebral contusion, Cortical contusion, Hip-pointer contusion.

con·tu·sion

(kŏn-tū'zhŭn)
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
See also: bruise, ecchymosis
[L. contusio, a bruising]

contusion

A bruise.

contusion

a common injury in sport, the result of direct contact without the skin being broken. If superficial, it will result in visible bruising. If deep, a haematoma will develop within the affected tissue, commonly muscle.

contusion

bruise

con·tu·sion

(kŏn-tū'zhŭn)
Any mechanical injury (usually caused by a blow) resulting in hemorrhage beneath unbroken skin.
[L. contusio, a bruising]

contusion (kəntōō´zhən),

n a bruise that is usually produced by impact from a blunt object and that does not cause a break in the skin.

contusion

injury to tissues without breakage of skin; a bruise. In a contusion, blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling and tenderness. In light-colored animals a discoloration may appear as a result of blood seepage under the surface of the skin.
Serious complications may develop in some cases of contusion. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but there is a possibility that blood clotted in the area will form a cyst or calcify and require surgical treatment. The contusion may also be complicated by infection.

cerebral contusion
contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurological defects or epilepsy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient underwent emergency surgery, including frontal craniectomy, cleaning and extensive surgical debridement of the wound, with the removal of bone and metallic fragments and drainage of the area of the cerebral contusion.
These authors referred to two other cases in the literature of hemorrhage into a lacerated frontal lobe occurring several weeks after "cerebral blast concussion" (shell explosion) with no solid blow to the head and to additional case reports of cerebral edema, petechial and meningeal hemorrhages, cerebral contusion and laceration, and intracerebral and subdural hematoma after a cerebral blast injury.
While air-filled organs are especially susceptible, the brain is vulnerable to direct injury from cerebral contusion or indirect injury--a cerebral infarction secondary to air emboli.