cerebellum

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Related to Cerebellar hemispheres: Cerebellar vermis

cerebellum

 [ser″ĕ-bel´um]
the part of the metencephalon situated on the back of the brainstem, to which it is attached by three peduncles on each side (the cerebellar peduncles); it consists of a median lobe (vermis) and two lateral lobes (the cerebellar hemispheres). See also brain.

cer·e·bel·lum

, pl.

ce·re·bel·la

(ser'e-bel'ŭm, -bel'ă), [TA]
The large posterior brain mass lying posterior (dorsal) to the pons and medulla and inferior to the tentorium cerebelli and posterior portion of the cerebrum; it consists of two lateral hemispheres united by a narrow middle portion, the vermis.
[L. dim. of cerebrum, brain]

cerebellum

/cer·e·bel·lum/ (ser″ah-bel´um) the part of the metencephalon situated on the back of the brain stem, to which it is attached by three cerebellar peduncles on each side; it consists of a median lobe (vermis) and two lateral lobes (the hemispheres).

cerebellum

(sĕr′ə-bĕl′əm)
n. pl. cere·bellums or cere·bella (-bĕl′ə)
The trilobed structure of the brain, lying posterior to the pons and medulla oblongata and inferior to the occipital lobes of the cerebral hemispheres, that is responsible for the regulation and coordination of complex voluntary muscular movement as well as the maintenance of posture and balance.

cer′e·bel′lar (-bĕl′ər) adj.

cerebellum

[ser′əbel′əm] pl. cerebellums, cerebella
Etymology: L, small brain
the part of the brain located in the posterior cranial fossa behind the brainstem. It consists of two lateral cerebellar hemispheres, or lobes, and a middle section called the vermis. Three pairs of peduncles link it with the brainstem. Its functions are concerned primarily with coordinating voluntary muscular activity.
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Cerebellum

cer·e·bel·lum

, pl. cerebella, pl. cerebellums (serĕ-belŭm, -ă, -ŭmz) [TA]
The large posterior brain mass lying dorsal to the pons and medulla and ventral to the posterior portion of the cerebrum; it consists of two lateral hemispheres united by a narrow middle portion, the vermis.
[L. dim. of cerebrum, brain]

cerebellum

The smaller sub-brain lying below and behind the CEREBRUM. The cerebellum has long been thought to be concerned only with the coordination of information concerned with posture, balance and fine voluntary movement. Recent studies have shown, however, that the cerebellum functions to assist in many cognitive and perceptual processes. The cerebellum may also have a role to play in coordinating sensory input, and even in memory, attention and emotion.

cerebellum

the anterior dorsal (and largest) part of the HINDBRAIN which controls balance, muscle tone and the coordination of voluntary muscle. It is best developed in birds and mammals; in the latter there is a cortex of grey matter and the surface is complexly folded. The folds are lined with PURKINJE CELLS. Removal of the cerebellum unbalances an animal and affects the accuracy of voluntary movements such as walking, swimming, knitting.

Cerebellum

The part of the brain involved in coordination of movement, walking, and balance.

cerebellum

posterior part of brain formed of right and left hemispheres united by the vermis; located superior to the pons and medulla and inferior to the posterior area of the cerebrum; it coordinates voluntary motor activity via afferent input (from proprioceptive organs in joints and muscles, the corticospinal system, basal ganglia, vestibular and olivary nuclei) and efferent output to the red nuclei, the vestibular nuclei, the basal ganglia and the corticospinal system; lateral lobe of each cerebellar hemisphere coordinates movement of ipsilateral limbs; vermis coordinates maintenance of axial (midline) posture and balance; any interruption to normal cerebellar function or its connections is characterized by impaired coordination of voluntary movement

cer·e·bel·lum

, pl. cerebella, pl. cerebellums (serĕ-belŭm, -ă, -ŭmz) [TA]
The large posterior brain mass lying dorsal to the pons and medulla and ventral to the posterior portion of the cerebrum; it consists of two lateral hemispheres united by a narrow middle portion, the vermis.
[L. dim. of cerebrum, brain]

cerebellum (ser´əbel´um),

n a major division of the brain, behind the cerebrum and above the pons and fourth ventricle, consisting of a median lobe, two lateral lobes, and major connections through pairs of peduncles to the cerebrum, pons, and medulla oblongata. It is connected with the auditory vestibular apparatus and the proprioceptive system of the body and hence is involved in maintenance of body equilibrium, orientation in space, and muscular coordination and tonus.

cerebellum

the part of the metencephalon situated on the back of the brainstem, to which it is attached by three cerebellar peduncles on each side; it consists of a median lobe (vermis) and two lateral lobes (the hemispheres). Structures in the cerebellum include cingulum, cerebellar cortex, culmen, pyramid of cerebellum, uvula and vermis. See also brain.

vestibular cerebellum

Patient discussion about cerebellum

Q. can you recover after a cerebellar stroke?

A. You can recover after a cerebellar stroke but the process takes time and rehabilitation. With the right kind of rehab people reach great results, supposing of course the initial injury allows it.

Q. Is there any problem, if an arachnoid cyst ,2cmx1.5cm size, rostral to cerebellar region left untreated? symptoms: repeated headaches, twitching of muscles, tiredness

A. An arachnoid cyst that leads to symptoms usually needs treatment. Mild symptoms as you suggested are ok to left untreated however gradual onset of new symptoms may arise such as seizures, paralysis and other complications, therefore once symptoms occur one should consider treatment.

More discussions about cerebellum
References in periodicals archive ?
Although rhombencephalosynapsis is usually described as a "fusion" anomaly, or dysplasia of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, and has been described in a patient with holoprosencephaly, (9,211) believe this malformation is probably the result of failed neuronal proliferation of the cerebellar hemispheres, much like holoprosencephaly of the cerebral hemispheres.
The cerebellar hemispheres are continuous across the midline (Figure 18).
These five regions included three gray-matter regions (left basal ganglia, left cerebellar hemisphere, and the cetebellar vermis) and two white-matter regions (left frontal and left parietal).
There were several smaller cystic lesions within the cerebellar hemispheres.
The vermian atrophy is more prominent than the atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres and is characteristic of the type of anatomic appearance seen in ataxia-telangiectasia.