cercopithecine


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cercopithecine

(sŭr″kō-pĭth′ĭ-sēn″, -sīn″) [NL fm. Gr. kerkos, tail + pithekos, ape]
A member of the Cercopithecinae, a subfamily of Old World monkeys that includes baboons, macaques, and other monkeys that spend their time partly on the ground and partly in trees. The males of each species are much larger and more aggressive than the females. All members of this subfamily have expandable cheek pouches for temporary storage of food, and bald, calloused skin overlying their ischial bones.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serological testing for tuberculosis, measles, cercopithecine herpes I, and simian viruses (SIV, SRV, and STLV) was performed annually while complete blood counts and clinical chemistries, diabetic markers, and bacteriological and parasitological fecal examination were performed quarterly as part of clinical health checks.
A comparative study of aggression and conciliation in three cercopithecine monkeys (Macaca fuscata, Macaca nigra, Papiopapio).
Apes are tailless nonhuman primates that diverged from the cercopithecine monkeys about 25,000,000 years ago.
B virus, also known as Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1), Herpesvirus simiae, Herpes simiae, or Simian B disease, is considered endemic among monkeys of the genus Macaca.
The same year this report was published, a splash to the eye unassociated with injury resulted in the Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 infection and subsequent death of a research assistant at a primate research center (2,3).
It wasn't that science didn't support their contentions: Since the early 1930s, primatologists have known that macaques carry Herpesvirus simiae, commonly known as herpes B or B virus (scientifically referred to as cercopithecine herpesvirus), which can cause a potentially fatal brain infection in humans.
Hrdy, "Intensity of local resource competition shapes the relationship between maternal rank and sex ratios at birth in cercopithecine primates," American Naturalist 138 (1991), pp.
Epidemiology of Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (B virus) infection and shedding in a large breeding cohort of rhesus macaques.
On December 10, 1997, a 22-year-old female worker at a primate center died from Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (B virus) infection 42 days after biologic material (possibly fecal) from a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) splashed into her right eye.
Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 risk in a child bitten by a bonnet macaque monkey.
An additional finding was the taxonomic affinity of EHV-9 and other equine alphaherpesviruses to herpes simplex virus 1 and cercopithecine herpesvirus 2.
SFV was conjugated to beads as previously described for simian retrovirus, simian T-cell leukemia virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (22).