ceramic

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ceramic

 [sĕ-ram´ik]
an object or material that is hard, brittle, and resistant to corrosion and heat, made by subjecting clay or a combination of minerals to high temperatures.
glass ceramic any of a number of forms of crystallized glass having a variety of properties and uses, including the manufacture of dental restorations; formed by heating to the point of crystallization an amorphous glass matrix to which impurities have been added to provide nuclei for crystal formation.

cer·a·mic

(sĕr-am'ik),
A product made primarily from nonmetallic mineral(s) by firing at a high temperature.
Randomized Intravascular Ultrasound Comparison Between EndopRostheses with and without AMorphous SIlicon-Carbide for the Prevention of Coronary Restenosis. A trial assessing the ability of amorphous silicon-carbide coating to decrease in-stent volume of intimal hyperplasia after elective coronary stenting
Primary endpoints Post-stenting in-stent volume of intimal hyperplasia, assessed by intravascular ultrasonography; major acute coronary events (MACE), and target lesion revascularisation
Conclusion It is not effective

cer·a·mic

(sĕr-am'ik)
A product made primarily from nonmetallic mineral(s) by firing at a high temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The brochure outlines CeramTec's expertise in ceramic materials and product development for current and emerging markets.
The company describes itself as a provider of ceramic solutions for the medical device industry, manufacturing medical grade components with an emphasis on ceramic materials.
These test results are useful in evaluating wear resistance when one ceramic material is compared with another and even when a ceramics sample is compared to one of steel.
It's easily machined with an ordinary drill or saw, and it won't shatter at temperatures far beyond those that would destroy other ceramic materials.
Rigid stainless steel single piece body - withstands pressure loads and pipeline forces to protect the ceramic material.
Still, he adds, the project shows there are ways of working ceramic materials into complex shapes and gives reason to believe that some of the fantastic visions for superconductors may become reality.
Commercial versions of the new ceramic material could play a central role in emission reduction.
Lockheed Martin is developing this high-temperature advanced ceramic material for potential use in future solid rocket motor applications.
Or they might act as ceramic material and form strings aligned with the field.
The multi-million dollar investment required for the center provides a comprehensive resource for advanced ceramic material development.
The advanced ceramic material industry has become capable of infinite potentials, no matter in military use or civil use.
At the same meeting, a group of Bell Labs researchers reported devising a way to prepare flexible superconducting wires that can carry more than 100 times as much current as any similar ceramic material even in the presence of a large magnetic field.