Centrocestus

Centrocestus

(sen'trō-ses'tŭs),
A genus of extremely small fish-borne flukes (family Heterophyidae) that may produce intestinal lesions similar to those caused by Heterophyes heterophyes. Centrocestus formosana has been reported in humans in Taiwan.
[G. kentron, point, center, + kestos, belt, both words fr. kenteō, to pierce]
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Centrocestus formosanus, an Asian gill trematode dependent on an operculate snail, red-rim melania snail (Melanoides tuberculatus), as an intermediate host, is thought to have been introduced into North America at least as early as the 1970s (Roessler et al.
We also collected red-rim melania snails at sites within nine of the spring systems and determined rates of infection by Centrocestus formosanus.
Respiratory responses of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (Cyprinidae) to parasitic infection by Centrocestus formosanus (Digenea).
viverrini flukes, metacercariae of the zoonotic intestinal flukes Centrocestus formosanus, Haplorchis taichui, and H.
ZOOGEOGRAPHY OF THE INVASIVE SNAIL, MELANOIDES TUBERCULATA (MULLER, 1774) AND ITS CONCOMITANT TREMATODE PATHOGEN, CENTROCESTUS FORMOSANUS (NISHIGORI, 1924).
Melanoides tuberculata (Gastropoda: Thiaridae), a parthenogenetic, operculate snail of Asian origin, is the most common first intermediate host of Centrocestus formosanus (Digenea: Heterophyidae), a pathogen of Asian origin that causes decreased fitness or mortality in second intermediate fish hosts.
The following FZT species were identified: Clonorchis sinensis (Opisthorchiidae), Centrocestus formosanus, Haplorchis pumilio (Heterophyidae), and Haplorchis yokogawi (Heterophyidae).
Centrocestus formosanus, and Stellantchasmus falcatus), and lecithodendriids have been found in humans (1,7,9).
Intestinal flukes, including Haplorchis pumilio and Centrocestus formosanus, were found in 55.
9) Fishborne zoonotic trematode species, n/N (%) Fish species and culture Centrocestus system Haplorchis taichui formosanus Overall 2/797 (0.
perfoliatus, Echinostoma cinetorchis, and Centrocestus formosanus) may represent an emerging problem.
A human case of Centrocestus armatus infection in Korea.