centriole

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centriole

 [sen´tre-ōl]
either of the two cylindrical organelles located in the centrosome and containing nine triplets of microtubules arrayed around their edges; centrioles migrate to opposite poles of the cell during cell division and serve to organize the spindles. They are capable of independent replication and of migrating to form basal bodies.
ring centriole a common misnomer for the anulus of the spermatozoon, which is not actually a centriole.

cen·tri·ole

(sen'trē-ōl),
Tubular structures, 150 nm by 300-500 nm, with a wall having nine triple microtubules, usually seen as paired organelles lying in the cytocentrum; centrioles may be multiple and numerous in some cells, such as the giant cells of bone marrow.
[G. kentron, a point, center]

centriole

/cen·tri·ole/ (sen´tre-ōl) either of the two cylindrical organelles located in the centrosome and containing nine triplets of microtubules arrayed around their edges; centrioles migrate to opposite poles of the cell during cell division and serve to organize the spindles. They are capable of independent replication and of migrating to form basal bodies.

centriole

(sĕn′trē-ōl′)
n.
One of two cylindrical cellular structures that are composed of nine triplet microtubules and form the asters during mitosis.

centriole

[sen′trē·ōl′]
Etymology: Gk, kentron
an intracellular organelle, usually a component of the centrosome. Often occurring in pairs, centrioles are associated with cell division and can be closely studied only with an electron microscope. They are tiny cylinders positioned at right angles to each other, with walls consisting of nine bundles of fine tubules, three tubules to a bundle. Numerous centrioles occur in some large cells, such as the giant cells in bone marrow. The precise function of centrioles is still a mystery, but they appear to aid in the formation of the spindle that develops during mitosis.

cen·tri·ole

(sen'trē-ōl)
Tubular structures usually seen as paired organelles lying in the cytocentrum; centrioles may be multiple and numerous in some cells, such as the giant cells of bone marrow.
[G. kentron, a point, center]

centriole

A short, hollow, cylindrical ORGANELLE consisting of nine sets of microtubules and usually occurring in pairs set at right angles to each other. Centrioles are responsible for the production of the spindle apparatus that appears just before the separation of the chromosomes into two sets prior to cell division.

centriole

One of the two rod-like bodies in cells forming the poles of the spindles during cell division.
Centrioleclick for a larger image
Fig. 97 Centriole . Structure and orientation.

centriole

one of a pair of small ORGANELLES lying at right angles to each other in an area known as the CENTROSOME, just outside the nucleus of lower plants and all animals (see Fig. 97 ). Centrioles are self-replicating, dividing into two during the ‘S’ phase of the INTERPHASE of the CELL CYCLE and then separating into two pairs, one pair migrating to each pole of the future mitotic spindle, from which an ASTER forms. The role of centrioles in nuclear division is unclear, since they are absent from most plant cells and laser-beam irradiation of centrioles has no effect on division.

centriole

either of the two cylindrical organelles located in the centrosome and containing nine triplets of microtubules arrayed around their edges; centrioles migrate to opposite poles of the cell during cell division and serve to organize the spindles. They are capable of independent replication and of migrating to form basal bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
elegans centrioles to determine if they contain a spiral or a cartwheel, as well as identify SAS-6-interacting components.
Unlike animal cells, where microtubules are nucleated at discrete centriole containing centrosomes, plant cells produced a bewildering assortment of microtubule arrays in the absence of centrosomes.
Centriole duplication in lysates of Spisula solidissima oocytes.
Developing spermatogonia and oogonia have two functional centrioles (diplosomes) in their centrosomes, showing the typical "9+0" organization of microtubule triplets --common to all somatic cells.
5) In human spermatogenesis characteristic double centrioles are seen.
In approximately half the channels, [gamma]-tubulin was associated with the centrioles that serve as the microtubule organi zing center for the spindle apparatus.
This approach has addressed the following aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis: the movement of centrioles to the poles, the movement of chromosomes to the equatorial plate, the alignment of chromosomes at the plate, the movement of chromosomes during anaphase, and rounding up and elongation of cells.
probasal bodies to centrioles and flagellar basal bodies (Figs.