cellulose

(redirected from Cellulose fibre)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Cellulose fibre: cellulose fiber

cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

/cel·lu·lose/ (sel´u-lōs) a rigid, colorless, unbranched, insoluble, long-chain polysaccharide, consisting of 3000 to 5000 glucose residues and forming the structure of most plant structures and of plant cells.
absorbable cellulose  oxidized c.
cellulose acetate  an acetylated cellulose used as a hemodialyzer membrane.
oxidized cellulose  an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, used as a local hemostatic.
cellulose sodium phosphate  an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing renal calculi.

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cellulose

[sel′yoo͡lōs]
Etymology: L, cellula, little cell
a colorless, insoluble, indigestible, transparent, solid polysaccharide that is the primary constituent of the cell walls of plants. In the diet it provides the bulk necessary for proper digestive tract functioning. Rich sources are fruits, such as apples and bananas, and legumes, bran, and green vegetables, especially celery. See also dietary fiber.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cellulose (selˑ·y·lōs),

n an unbran-ched 1–4-beta-glucose polymer found in fruits, grains, seeds, and vegetables. A major dietary fiber, cellulose increases fecal size and weight because of its ability to bind water.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose,

n the primary component of plant cell walls; provides the fiber and bulk necessary for optimal functioning of the digestive tract.
cellulose, oxidized
n cellulose, in the form of cotton, gauze, or paper, that has been more or less completely oxidized.

cellulose

a polysaccharide containing β1→4 linked glucose carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. In herbivores, digested by bacteria in the rumen or cecum, primarily to volatile fatty acids which can be used as a source of energy.

absorbable cellulose
an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding. Called also oxidized cellulose.
cellulose acetate
the most popular support field used in the electrophoresis of proteins.
oxidized cellulose
see absorbable cellulose (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
An understandably larger variety of cellulose fibres is found in recycling papers, where besides primary cellulose fibres also mechanical pulp can be found, since the origin of fibre has no significant meaning, as the texture of end use does.
Microstructure of cellulose fibres in samples was examined to detect structure modifications with a scanning electron microscopy (ESEM X-L30) (Philips).
The efficiency of cellulose fibres in reinforcing the polymer matrix is primarily determined by the degree of its dispersion in the matrix [22].
By increasing considerably the screw speed (set at 1200 rpm), high shearing forces applied during the extrusion allow to improve the cellulose fibres dispersion but not to an acceptable level.
Using an LDPE powder instead of pellets, into severe process conditions, seems to be a good way to prevent early compaction of the cellulose fibres during extrusion.
It appears clearly from these results, that the injection of water under high pressure and temperature separates the cellulose fibres from agglomerates more efficiently than shearing forces.
With the cellulose fibres in a solution of water, an electrically charged polymer, also in a water solution, is added.
The separation of fibres according to size were done by the means of sieve analysis where 300 g of cellulose fibres were shaken for 10 minute through the set of sieves.
Lenzing is the only manufacturer in the world that has mastered the technology for producing this latest generation of cellulose fibres on a large industrial scale.
At the signing of the loan contract, Wilhelm Molterer, EIB Vice-President responsible for lending operations in Austria, stated, Today, Lenzing is a technology leader in the field of man-made cellulose fibres, thanks in part to its ambitious research and development activities.
The company will decide on the future ownership structure of the plastics division after a thorough assessment of the proposals, it said, adding that the divestment would allow it to concentrate on its core man-made cellulose fibres operations.
We have production facilities in Austria, the United States and Indonesia, and we are the only manufacturer of viscose fibres or man-made cellulose fibres which has its own production facilities in all three major world markets, which is an asset in itself.

Full browser ?