lysis

(redirected from Cell lysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

/ly·sis/ (li´sis)
1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.

lysis

[lī′sis]
Etymology: Gk, lysein, to loosen
1 destruction or dissolution of a cell or molecule through the action of a specific agent. Cell lysis is frequently caused by a lysin. lytic, adj.
2 gradual diminution in the symptoms of a disease. Compare crisis.
3 surgery performed to free adhesions of tissues. See also adhesiotomy. lyse, v.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).

lysis

enzyme-dependent destruction (liquefaction) of cells or tissues

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis (lī´sis),

n the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease. The disintegration or dissolution of cells by a lysin.

lysis

1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under the influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the clinical signs of a disease, e.g. lysis of a fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there may be incremental benefits of increased cell lysis with additional exposure time of cancer cells to water, this needs to be individually weighed by the risk of prolonging the time of surgery for the patient.
Chaotropic salts can be used for cell lysis and binding to a silica surface (32).
Shrinkage in cell size, change in cells shape to round and cell lysis was observed at 1.
After 20 minutes of room temperature incubation in the dark, red cell lysis was initiated with 2 mL of buffered ammonium chloride (made fresh from 10X stock), followed by 8 to 10 minutes of incubation, without washing.
Gradual cell lysis and the involvement of interference factors are considered as the main contributors to the difference observed.
Solution MD1 (50 [micro]l [MO BIO]) was added to each sample, and samples were incubated at 70 [degrees]C for 10 min to facilitate cell lysis.
Treatment with rhodomyrtone at the 2MBC, 4MBC, and 8MBC had no effect (OD620 range, 82-99% of the original) on the cell lysis within 24 h.
Contaminant interference (either from detergents or enzymes used in the chemical cell lysis process, or cell based contaminants such as proteins) can significantly affect fluorescence readings of these dyes.
To study biological materials, such as proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes, they must first be released from cell samples using a procedure called cell disruption or cell lysis.
The indirect consequences of these agents on antigen presentation can adversely affect the proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions of T lymphocytes--including cell signaling mechanisms, cytokine secretion, developmental maturation, and target cell lysis by CD[8.
Late infection results in cell lysis from cell death.
Cell lysis was performed using 600[micro]L of Nuclei Lysis Solution and incubated at 80[degrees]C for 5 min.