lysis

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lysis

 [li´sis]
1. destruction, as of cells by a specific lysin.
2. decomposition, as of a chemical compound by a specific agent. See also degradation.
3. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
4. the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

ly·sis

(lī'sis),
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (for example, hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease, a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

/ly·sis/ (li´sis)
1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease.

lysis

(lī′sĭs)
n. pl. ly·ses (-sēz)
1. Biochemistry The dissolution or destruction of cells, such as blood cells or bacteria, as by the action of a specific lysin that disrupts the cell membrane.
2. Medicine The gradual subsiding of the symptoms of an acute disease.

lysis

[lī′sis]
Etymology: Gk, lysein, to loosen
1 destruction or dissolution of a cell or molecule through the action of a specific agent. Cell lysis is frequently caused by a lysin. lytic, adj.
2 gradual diminution in the symptoms of a disease. Compare crisis.
3 surgery performed to free adhesions of tissues. See also adhesiotomy. lyse, v.

lysis

Destruction of cells with release of contents. See Antibody-mediated lysis, Cytolysis, Follicle lysis, Hemolysis, NK-mediated lysis.

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by the structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis); may be due to a direct toxin or an immune mechanism, such as antibody reacting with antigen on the surface of a target cell, usually by binding and activation of a series of proteins in the blood with enzymatic activity (complement system).
2. Gradual subsidence of the symptoms of an acute disease; a form of the recovery process, as distinguished from crisis.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis

The destruction of a living cell by disruption of its membrane. Haemolysis is lysis of red blood cells. This will occur if the cells are placed in plain water.

lysis

the rupturing of a cell with release of its contents; for example, the bursting of a bacterial cell to release BACTERIOPHAGES, or HAEMOLYSIS - the bursting of a red blood cell (see RHESUS HAEMOLYTIC ANAEMIA).

lysis

enzyme-dependent destruction (liquefaction) of cells or tissues

ly·sis

(lī'sis)
1. Destruction of red blood cells, bacteria, and other structures by a specific lysin, usually referred to by structure destroyed (e.g., hemolysis, bacteriolysis, nephrolysis).
2. Gradual subsidence of symptoms of an acute disease, a form of recovery.
[G. dissolution or loosening]

lysis (lī´sis),

n the gradual abatement of the symptoms of a disease. The disintegration or dissolution of cells by a lysin.

lysis

1. destruction or decomposition, as of a cell or other substance, under the influence of a specific agent.
2. mobilization of an organ by division of restraining adhesions.
3. gradual abatement of the clinical signs of a disease, e.g. lysis of a fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there may be incremental benefits of increased cell lysis with additional exposure time of cancer cells to water, this needs to be individually weighed by the risk of prolonging the time of surgery for the patient.
After 15 minutes of room-temperature incubation in the dark, red cell lysis was initiated with 1 mL of ammonium chloride, followed by 3 to 5 minutes of incubation before flow cytometry.
In those experiments where we were examining the effect on fluorescence of chemical reagents commonly used for cell lysis, the nucleic acid standards were spiked at concentrations that would be used in sample extracts to account for interference.
Cell lysis was performed by exposing sediments to 3 consecutive freeze-thaw cycles in liquid nitrogen and incubation at 75[degrees]C.
1) In our patient, we postulate that doxorubicin-based chemotherapy induced rapid cell lysis and necrosis of peripherally located metastatic pulmonary nodules, leading to the pneumothoraces.
Alternatively, in its lytic phase, P1 can promote cell lysis during growth resulting in host cell death.
GM-CSF complements the cancer cell lysis of the product candidate, leading to a cascade of events resulting in tumor necrosis, tumor vasculature shutdown and sustained anti-tumoral immune attack.
Importantly, cell lysis of statin-treated B-cells was consistently higher when using ofatumumab in comparison to rituximab.
It also showed a marked activity on cell lysis of trophozoites, 4 h after administration.
Numbrecht, Germany) and frozen (-20[degrees]C) until cell lysis and extraction and precipitation of DNA with ethanol was implemented.
In Cr51 assays, we found that abrogation of breast cancer cell TGF-b production through an anti-sense (TS/A-AS) transfection approach increased Tc1 and Tc2 cell lysis of tumor cells relative to sham transfected (TS/A-CAT) or wild-type (TS/A) tumor cells that produced high levels of TGF-b.
Use of pressure cycling technology for cell lysis and recovery of bacterial and fungal communities from soil; Dr.