genome

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Related to Cell genome: genomic DNA

genome

 [je´nōm]
the complete set of genes, hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes; the human genome has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 genes. adj., adj genom´ic.

ge·nome

(je'nōm, -nom),
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
See also: Human Genome Project.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project.
[gene + -ome, suffix denoting a defined system or microcosm, fr. G. -ōma, noun suffix]

genome

/ge·nome/ (je´nōm) the complete set of hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes.genom´ic

genome

(jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.

ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.

genome

[jē′nōm]
Etymology: Gk, genein, to produce
the complete set of genes in the chromosomes of each cell of a specific organism. genomic, adj.

genome

Genetic structure Genetics All the genetic information in an organism's chromosomes and mitochondria; its size is given in base pairs. See Base pair, Chromosome, Mitochondrial genome, Nuclear genome.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project
[G. genos, birth + (chromos) ome]

genome

The complete set of CHROMOSOMES, together with the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA, containing the entire genetic material of the cell.

genome

the complete complement of genetic material in a cell, or carried by an individual.

Genome

The genetic makeup of a cell, composed of DNA.
Mentioned in: Malignant Melanoma

genome

total gene complement of a set of chromosomes

genome

The complete set of genes in an individual. In humans it is estimated at approximately 30 000 genes and over three billion base pairs (two nucleotides joined together across a double helix) of DNA.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
Complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent; haploid number of a gamete.

genome (jē´nōm),

n the total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms.
genome, human,
n the complete set of genes in the chromosomes of each cell.

genome

all of the genes carried by a gamete, i.e. the complete set of hereditary factors contained in the chromosomal DNA. For some viruses, the genome is RNA.

diploid genome
having two genetically identical RNA molecules of RNA, characteristic of retroviruses.
integrated genome
the integration of the viral DNA into the cellular DNA of the host, as occurs in some kinds of persistent infections and the induction of tumors.
segmented genome
the genome is composed of separate segments. A characteristic of some viruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Retroviral integration, the process that stably inserts the DNA copy of the viral genomic RNA into the host cell genome, is an essential step for productive infection and is catalyzed by the HIV integrase.
By combining shRNA with Lentigen's proprietary viral vector delivery system, the gene silencing sequence is integrated into the host cell genome.
This is the process that stably inserts the DNA copy of the viral genomic RNA into the host cell genome.
Such baculoviruses can be used to efficiently deliver genes to mammalian cells or organisms, and such genes can be expressed either from the baculovirus genome, or integrated into the mammalian cell genome, and can be used for expression of proteins such that purification of secreted or other protein products does not require removal of contaminating baculovirus particles or baculovirus envelope proteins.
The team undertook several different research tactics and experiments, including single cell genome amplification, protein and metabolite profiling.