cell culture

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Related to Cell cultures: adherent cell, Cell lines

culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.

cell cul·ture

the maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell culture

n.
1. The technique or process of growing bacterial or fungal cells or cells derived from tissues of living organisms in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells grown by this technique or process.

cell culture

Etymology: L, cella, storeroom, colere, to cultivate
living cells that are maintained in vitro in artificial media of serum and nutrients for the study and growth of certain strains of microorganisms or for experiments in controlling diseases, such as cancer. They are routinely used to culture viruses that infect patients.

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell culture

the artificial culture of living tissue outside a living body. Animal cells were originally grown in culture as explant cultures, i.e. small pieces of tissue. If pieces of tissue are treated with enzymes such as trypsin, single cell suspensions can be obtained which will settle onto glass or plastic surfaces and grow to form a monolayer cell culture. Primary cell cultures can be passaged to form secondary cell cultures. Cells in culture can be passaged a finite number of times before reaching a crisis which can be compared with aging. The number of passages, before reaching crisis, has been termed the Hayflick limit and is related to the longevity of the species from which the tissue was originally derived. Within the Hayflick limit the cells are referred to as a cell strain. Cells that survive the crisis and continue to grow are referred to as a cell line. Cell lines can also be derived directly from cancer cells. There are many properties that distinguish cell lines from cell strains, including altered chromosome number, changes at the cell membrane, and reduced requirement for certain growth factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, hybridoma technology has been used to develop a murine hybridoma cells producing monoclonal antibody by the conditioning of cell culture media with different carbohydrates in vitro.
New advancements in the field of microfluidics are being used to create precise 3D cell cultures that parallel in vivo tissues and their microenvironments.
Themed Principles of Mammalian Cell Culture Training Course, the event drew the participation of 12 faculty, students and researchers from QU and other institutions in Qatar such as Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) and Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI).
Cell culture is used in molecular and cellular biology and assists in studying the physiology and biochemistry of cells (aging and metabolic studies), the effect of biomolecules and drugs on the cells, and mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies.
The CytoSMART System offers assurance that cells are safe without having to be in the lab and provides functions, such as reporting ongoing cell confluency via a graphical readout, while automatic email alerts can be set to inform the user when milestones are reached (for example, once the cell culture has reached a certain confluency).
He had just finished a stint in industry, where he had been developing microfluidics systems--miniature fluid-manipulating devices--for testing drugs on cell cultures.
The virus source used in these experiments is the same as that previously analyzed (3), and led to the tentative conclusion that a coronavirus was present in the primary cell cultures from patients with the endemic nephropathy.
Routine ultrastructural examination disclosed that the raised areas of the cell cultures displayed the stratification expected of differentiated urothelial cells.
This method was further developed for large-scale cell culture production and was found to be helpful in protein synthesis processes, such as insulin production.
However, there are several limitations associated with 2D cell culture that hamper the morphology, growth rate, cell function, viability and the overall behavior of the cell as compared to the natural environment.
After spotting a likely compound, the researchers added it to normal cell cultures and found that the cells indeed took up more cholesterol than normal.
Contents: List of protocols Abbreviations 1 Introduction to basic principles 2 Scaling-up of animal cell cultures 3 Cell line preservation and authentication 4 Development of serum-free media 5 Three-dimensional culture 6 Tissue engineering 7 Cytotoxlclty and viability assays 8 Fluorescence In situ hybridization 9 Genetic modification 10 Epithelial stem cell Identification, isolation, and culture David Hudson 11 Senescence, apoptosis, and necrosis Ian R.