cell culture

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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.

cell cul·ture

the maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell culture

n.
1. The technique or process of growing bacterial or fungal cells or cells derived from tissues of living organisms in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells grown by this technique or process.

cell culture

Etymology: L, cella, storeroom, colere, to cultivate
living cells that are maintained in vitro in artificial media of serum and nutrients for the study and growth of certain strains of microorganisms or for experiments in controlling diseases, such as cancer. They are routinely used to culture viruses that infect patients.

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell cul·ture

(sel kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance or growth of dispersed cells after removal from the body, commonly on a glass surface immersed in nutrient fluid.

cell culture

the artificial culture of living tissue outside a living body. Animal cells were originally grown in culture as explant cultures, i.e. small pieces of tissue. If pieces of tissue are treated with enzymes such as trypsin, single cell suspensions can be obtained which will settle onto glass or plastic surfaces and grow to form a monolayer cell culture. Primary cell cultures can be passaged to form secondary cell cultures. Cells in culture can be passaged a finite number of times before reaching a crisis which can be compared with aging. The number of passages, before reaching crisis, has been termed the Hayflick limit and is related to the longevity of the species from which the tissue was originally derived. Within the Hayflick limit the cells are referred to as a cell strain. Cells that survive the crisis and continue to grow are referred to as a cell line. Cell lines can also be derived directly from cancer cells. There are many properties that distinguish cell lines from cell strains, including altered chromosome number, changes at the cell membrane, and reduced requirement for certain growth factors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The database currently tags 122,000 individuals working in Cell Culture Techniques.
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A detailed collection of procedures and methods for multiplying orchids, including organ, tissue, and cell culture techniques in vitro.
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This unique overview of plants and transgenic techniques of great scientific, medicinal and economic value for both industry and academia covers the whole spectrum from cell culture techniques, via genetic engineering and secondary product metabolism right up to the use of transgenic plants for the production of bioactive compounds.
While her early work centered on general infectious diseases and bacterial pathogencity, her recent area of interest is in cell culture techniques, immunoassays and monoclonal antibodies and nanobacterial pathogenicity.
The Coriell Institute for Medical Research is an internationally-known biomedical research institution that pioneered many cell culture techniques that are now standard throughout the world.
Baxter's pipeline of vaccines includes both viral and bacterial products derived from broadly applicable technology platforms, including large-scale cell culture techniques and polysaccharide-protein conjugates, and includes influenza and various meningococcal conjugates alone and in combination.
For example, we are comparing the binding abilities of the avian produced antibody with that of the same antibody produced by standard mammalian cell culture techniques, currently among the most widely used methods of biological drug production.
Through the use of innovative cell culture techniques, MSU scientists have unleashed the naturally occurring hidden potential of tolerance to imidazolinone herbicides in sugar beets," said Donald Penner Ph.