celebrity worship syndrome

(redirected from Celebrity worship)

celebrity worship syndrome

A common condition of intense preoccupation with all ascertainable aspects, real or media-contrived, of the life of a current ‘star’ personality. In severe cases the syndrome amounts to an obsession that may feature stalking and other criminal activity. The syndrome is now taken seriously by psychologists and even by some anthropologists who hold that celebrities have always provided useful role models. Fortunately, for most, celebrity worship is no more than a harmless entertainment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Al Sindi blamed social media and celebrity worship for factors contributing to the disorder, adding the large number of celebrities having plastic surgery was driving down the threshold for going under the knife.
1) However, to date, there is no definitive study which causally links celebrity worship with undesirable attitudes and behaviors, but there is an accumulation of findings that suggest that investing a great deal of time, energy, and devotion to celebrities is associated with a variety of indices of poorer psychological well-being.
had sexism and racism and all of that stuff, and Versace-Cunanan has a huge amount of homophobia and celebrity worship 6 and why did that happen in that beginning of that culture?
Kill the Boy Band does a fine job of scrutinizing the world of celebrity worship.
Vermes' book reminds us of our disgust for celebrity worship of our existing (or potential) leaders that is based on their looks, bank accounts or their ability to 'win' the vapid 24-hour news cycle with a catchy tweet, or to infiltrate your Facebook feed with a choice nugget about a political opponent.
She delivers a scalpel-sharp dissection of celebrity worship - with "nation's sweetheart" Cheryl Cole, Peter Andre and Tulisa all finding themselves in her crosshairs alongside the media which builds them up and knocks them down.
His proposal that "the object of identification in celebrity worship is not a particular person but the public sphere itself" is suggestive (106, cf.
that sun-drenched neo-noir hellhole where toxic celebrity worship, police corruption and the ever-present traumas of high school continue to hold sway a full decade after Veronica left town and swore never to look back.
It's us, their adoring public with our fawning, read-all-about-it celebrity worship.
We are all absorbed by celebrity worship and childish ostentatious display of wealth, but we are the stupid victims of those who decide what to inform us about.
This celebrity worship is the mindset of a lot of our teenagers.
CLIFF JONES, Bristol IN this age of celebrity worship, it is an inspired move by David Cameron that we shall all vote for someone like Jonathan Ross, Russell Brand or Esther Rantzen to be in control of police forces with powers to dispense with any chief constable who fails to satisfy.