catkin

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catkin

an INFLORESCENCE usually in the form of a pendulous spike of unisexual, much-reduced flowers, e.g. the male catkin of hazel, which produces pollen to be distributed by the wind.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, we were interested in the following questions: (1) does the level of damage by Black Bears differ between male and female Black Cottonwood trees; (2) does the size of the Black Cottonwood tree affect the level of catkin and seed pod harvest by Black Bears; (3) what is the potential nutrient value of male and female Black Cottonwood catkins and of seed pods; and (4) what is the nutritional composition of Black Cottonwood catkins and seed pods compared to some other potential plant foods that are present in the area in spring, namely male catkins of Sitka Alder (Alnus viridis sinuata), which apparently are not eaten, and stem-bases of Northern Ground Cone (Boschniakia rossi), which are frequently eaten?
Paul O'Byrne at Plas Newydd, (top), willow (left), and hazel catkins (right)
FLOWER DESCRIPTION: Monoecious, male in pendulous catkins clustered on previous years growth, female flowers solitary in clusters in leaf axils of new leaves.
To control for slight size differences among branches, we calculated the proportion of long shoots and female catkins from the total number of shoots in the branches (total shoot number = number of vegetative short shoots + number of short shoots bearing female catkins + number of long shoots).
And over all were broken-off catkins of pussy willow.
He found that only the diet, composed of either catkins o r leaves, mattered.
The hazel is wind pollinated, so the pollen from the catkins is blown to the delicate female flowers.
OUTSIDE the greenhouse, the hazel is full of catkins - I wonder if it's going to be another bumper year for blossom?
Its catkins are soft red - almost the colour of bricks - and its pink buds open to leaves that become a more resplendent purple as they age.
In February the stems will be further decorated by the 5cm (2in) long pale yellow hazel catkins.
Garrya elliptica is a handsome evergreen shrub with olive green foliage and long greyish green catkins in January and February.
The three most common members of the family, hazel, birch and alder, are all in flower, male catkins dangling and dancing in the slightest breeze, and tiny female flowers, green on birch, red on alder and hazel, await the wind blown pollen which turns them into cones on birches and alders and nuts on hazels.