catecholamine

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catecholamine

 [kat″ĕ-kol´ah-mēn″]
any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine

/cat·e·chol·amine/ (kat″ah-kol´ah-mēn″) any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

catecholamine

(kăt′ĭ-kō′lə-mēn′, -kô′-)
n.
Any of a group of monoamines, including epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine, that act as neurotransmitters and hormones.

catecholamine

[kat′əkəlam′in]
any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol (1,2-dihydroxyphenyl) moiety carrying an alkyl side chain with an amine group on the side chain. Some catecholamines are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurological chemicals.

catecholamine

Endocrinology A biogenic amine from tyramine/phenylalanine which contains a catechol nucleus Examples Epinephrine–adrenaline in UK, norepinephrine–noradrenaline and dopamine, which act as hormones and neurotransmitter in the peripheral and central nervous system; catecholamines are produced by sympathetic nervous system activation Activity Autonomic arousal, fight-or-flight stress response, reward response. See Biogenic amine, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Indolamine, Norepinephrine.

catecholamine

any CATECHOL-derived compound such as adrenalin or dopamine, which exert a neurotransmitting action similar to that of the sympathetic nervous system (see AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM).

catecholamine (kat´əkō´ləmēn´),

n any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol molecule and the aliphatic portion of amine. Some catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurologic chemicals.

catecholamine

any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.
The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine-depleting agents
cause depletion of neuronal stores of norepinephrine, thereby reducing adrenergic responses, e.g. reserpine.