casual

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casual

adjective Occurring unpredictably; irregular.

casual

an introduced plant that has not become established in an area but which may occur away from cultivation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here are the reasons some firms give for going casual: 1) to be more like their high-tech clients where casual dress has been the norm since the 1980; 2) to give them an edge in recruiting and 3) to improve productivity.
While the same directional trend was found for the remaining dependent variables, the base rates for both work-life balance (43% for the Best and 22% for the Biggest) and a casual dress policy (19% for the Best and 10% for the Biggest) were considerably lower.
Maysonave, who has nearly 20 years of experience as a business image consultant, wrote Casual Power to demystify the questions about business casual dress which have haunted many of her clients.
Unlike Europeans, most Americans have never had a tradition of elegant casual dress.
To capitalize on the relaxed trend, Finley says his company is coming out with what he calls a fairly significant casual dress line for men in the fall of 1995.
Many companies adopted casual dress policies during the heady 1990s.
ROYAL REPRIMAND: An Ascot cameraman in casual dress (above), and, more traditionally, in top hat and tails (right)
While 80 percent of American corporations are loosening their ties and instituting a casual dress policy, few provide written guidelines for their employees.
Human resource managers believe there are many benefits from allowing casual dress at work.
The survey revealed that 77 percent of Boston's top employers have "casual days" where more casual dress is acceptable.
This year, the number of companies permitting casual dress at least once a week fell to 86%, a sharp drop-off from the high of 95% in 1999, according to the Society for Human Resource Management.
17 /PRNewswire/ -- Casual dress codes continue to gain greater acceptance by corporate America, according to a new survey commissioned by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and Levi Strauss Co.