case control

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case control

A form of research in which patients with a disease are compared with closely matched individuals who do not have the disease. It is used to uncover risk factors or exposures that may produce illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exposure to pesticides and Parkinson's disease: a community-based case-control study among a population characterised by a high prevalence of exposure.
The organization and function of hospital infection control committees are discussed, and guidance for performing basic cohort and case-control studies is presented.
1) In a multicenter case-control study, women with a BRCA1 mutation who were ever-users of oral contraceptives had 20% higher odds of having had breast cancer than never-users.
Genetic study designs for the program include twin-based, family-centered and case-control approaches.
Obesity and hypertension may interact to increase the risk of renal cell carcinoma to a greater degree than does either factor alone, according to results of a case-control study.
2004), which they describe as a case-control study that reports that ovarian disease in women is related to blood levels of BPA.
Our hypothesis could be refuted or corroborated in several ways, for example, by a case-control study of HIV-negative patients infected with tuberculosis.
Women who have human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the cervix have a greater risk of invasive cervical cancer if they also have genital herpes, according to a pooled analysis of case-control studies.
NASDAQ: ILMN) announced today that the NIDDK(1) Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Genetics Consortium will utilize the Sentrix(R) HumanHap300 BeadChips and Infinium(TM) assay reagents to genotype over 2000 case-control samples for a genome-wide study designed to help identify genetic variants that increase susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD).
Hypercholesterolemia was directly associated with the incidence of prostate cancer in a retrospective case-control analysis of nearly 2,800 men.
In my work on iMHG, using a nested case-control study that was not cited by Fewtrell (2004), I confirmed that cofactors (feeding practices, individual and infant physiology, etc.
In a case-control study that used a survey instrument that focused on these 11 food exposures, controls were matched to case-patients by sex and age group, and were asked about exposures during the same 5-day period before the matching case-patient's illness onset.