arytenoid cartilage

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ar·y·te·noid car·ti·lage

[TA]
one of a pair of small triangular pyramidal laryngeal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the cricoid cartilage. It gives attachment at its anteriorly directed vocal process to the posterior part of the corresponding vocal ligament and to several muscles at its laterally directed muscular process. The base of the cartilage is hyaline but the apex is elastic.

arytenoid cartilage

[ä·rit′ənoid kär′ti·ləj]
Etymology: Gk, arytaina, ladle + eidos, form; L, cartilago
one of the paired, pitcher-shaped cartilages of the back of the larynx at the upper border of the cricoid cartilage with attachments to the vocal chords.

ar·y·te·noid car·ti·lage

(ari-tēnoyd kahrti-lăj) [TA]
One of a pair of small triangular pyramidal laryngeal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the cricoid cartilage. It gives attachment at its anteriorly directed vocal process to the posterior part of the corresponding vocal ligament and to several muscles at its laterally directed muscular process.
Synonym(s): cartilago arytenoidea [TA] .

ar·y·te·noid car·ti·lage

(ari-tēnoyd kahrti-lăj) [TA]
One of a pair of small triangular pyramidal laryngeal cartilages that articulate with lamina of cricoid cartilage.

arytenoid

shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage.

arytenoid abscess
see laryngeal chondritis.
arytenoid cartilage
one of the paired laryngeal cartilages in the dorsal part of the larynx that provides attachment for the muscles that adduct and abduct the vocal cords. The cartilages form the dorsal boundary of the rima glottis, the vocal cords the ventral boundary.
arytenoid chondritis
inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage that causes a syndrome similar to that caused by recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis.
arytenoid lateralization
a surgical technique used to treat laryngeal paralysis in dogs. One or both arytenoid cartilages are fixed in a lateral position with sutures, thereby enlarging the diameter of the laryngeal lumen.