joint

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Related to Cartilaginous joints: Synovial joints

joint

 [joint]
the site of the junction or union of two or more bones of the body; its primary function is to provide motion and flexibility to the frame of the body. Some are immovable, such as the sutures where segments of bone are fused together in the skull. Others, such as those between the vertebrae, are gliding joints and have limited motion. However, most joints allow considerable motion. The most common type are the synovial joints, which have a complex internal structure, composed not only of ends of bones but also of ligaments, cartilage, the articular capsule, the synovial membrane, and sometimes bursae.
acromioclavicular joint the point at which the clavicle joins with the acromion.
ankle joint the joint between the foot and the leg; see ankle.
arthrodial joint gliding joint.
ball-and-socket joint a synovial joint in which the rounded or spheroidal surface of one bone (the “ball”) moves within a cup-shaped depression (the “socket”) on another bone, allowing greater freedom of movement than any other type of joint. See illustration. Called also polyaxial or spheroidal joint.
bicondylar joint a condylar joint with a meniscus between the articular surfaces, as in the temporomandibular joint.
cartilaginous joint a type of synarthrosis in which the bones are united by cartilage, providing slight flexible movement; the two types are synchondrosis and symphysis.
composite joint (compound joint) a type of synovial joint in which more than two bones are involved.
condylar joint (condyloid joint) one in which an ovoid head of one bone moves in an elliptical cavity of another, permitting all movements except axial rotation; this type is found at the wrist, connecting the radius and carpal bones, and at the base of the index finger. See illustration.
diarthrodial joint synovial joint.
elbow joint the synovial joint between the humerus, ulna, and radius. See also elbow.
ellipsoidal joint condylar joint.
facet j's the articulations of the vertebral column.
fibrous joint a joint in which the union of bony elements is by continuous intervening fibrous tissue, which makes little motion possible; the three types are suture, syndesmosis, and gomphosis. Called also immovable or synarthrodial joint and synarthrosis.
flail joint an unusually mobile joint, such as results when joint resection is done to relieve pain.
glenohumeral joint the synovial joint formed by the head of the humerus and the glenoid cavity of the scapula. Called also humeral joint and shoulder joint.
gliding joint a synovial joint in which the opposed surfaces are flat or only slightly curved, so that the bones slide against each other in a simple and limited way. The intervertebral joints are this type, and many of the small bones of the wrist and ankle also meet in gliding joints. Called also arthrodial joint and plane joint.
hinge joint a synovial joint that allows movement in only one plane, forward and backward. Examples are the elbow and the interphalangeal joints of the fingers. The jaw is primarily a hinge joint but it can also move somewhat from side to side. The knee and ankle joints are hinge joints that also allow some rotary movement. See illustration. Called also ginglymus.
hip joint the synovial joint formed at the head of the femur and the acetabulum of the hip. See illustration at hip.
humeral joint glenohumeral joint.
immovable joint fibrous j.
knee joint the compound joint between the femur, patella, and tibia.
pivot joint a synovial joint in which one bone pivots within a bony or an osseoligamentous ring, allowing only rotary movement; an example is the joint between the first and second cervical vertebrae (the atlas and axis). See illustration. Called also rotary or trochoid joint.
plane joint gliding joint.
polyaxial joint ball-and-socket joint.
rotary joint pivot joint.
sacroiliac joint the joint between the sacrum and ilium in the lower back; see also sacroiliac joint.
saddle joint a synovial joint whose movement resembles that of a rider on horseback, who can shift in several directions at will; there is a saddle joint at the base of the thumb, so that the thumb is more flexible and complex than the other fingers but is also more difficult to treat if injured.
shoulder joint humeral joint.
simple joint a type of synovial joint in which only two bones are involved.
spheroidal joint ball-and-socket joint.
synarthrodial joint fibrous j.
synovial joint a specialized joint that permits more or less free movement, the union of the bony elements being surrounded by an articular capsule enclosing a cavity lined by synovial membrane. Called also articulation and diarthrosis. A capillary network in the synovial membrane provides nutrients and synovial fluid to nourish and lubricate the joint space. Strong fibrous bands or cords (ligaments) give strength and security to synovial joints. The majority of the body's joints are of this type. They are divided into five types according to structure and motion: ball and socket, gliding, saddle, hinge, and pivot.
Joints.
trochoid joint pivot joint.
temporomandibular joint (TMJ) a bicondylar joint formed by the head of the mandible and the mandibular fossa, and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone. See also temporomandibular joint disorder.

joint

(joynt), [TA]
anatomy the place of union, usually more or less movable, between two or more rigid skeletal components (bones, cartilage, or parts of a single bone). Joints between skeletal elements exhibit a great variety of form and function, and are classified into three general morphologic types: fibrous joints; cartilaginous joints; and synovial joints.
Synonym(s): junctura (1) [TA], articulation (1) , articulus
[L. junctura; fr. jungo, pp. junctus, to join]

joint

(joint) the site of junction or union between bones, especially one that allows motion of the bones.
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Various kinds of joints. Fibrous: A, syndesmosis (tibiofibular); B, suture (skull). Cartilaginous: C, symphysis (vertebral bodies); D, synchondrosis (first rib and sternum). Synovial: E, condyloid (wrist); F, gliding (radioulnar); G, hinge or ginglymus (elbow); H, ball and socket (hip); I, saddle (carpometacarpal of thumb); J, pivot (atlantoaxial).

amphidiarthrodial joint  amphidiarthrosis.
arthrodial joint  plane j.
ball-and-socket joint  spheroidal j.
biaxial joint  one with two chief axes of movement, at right angles to each other.
bicondylar joint  a condylar joint with a meniscus between the articular surfaces, such as the temporomandibular joint.
bilocular joint  one with two synovial compartments separated by an interarticular cartilage.
cartilaginous joint  a type of synarthrosis in which the bones are united by cartilage.
Charcot's joint  neuropathic arthropathy.
Chopart's joint  one between the calcaneus and the cuboid bone and the talus and navicular bone.
cochlear joint  a hinge joint that permits some rotation or lateral motion.
composite joint , compound joint one in which several bones articulate.
condylar joint , condyloid joint ellipsoidal joint; one in which an ovoid head of one bone moves in an elliptical cavity of another, permitting all movements except axial rotation.
diarthrodial joint  synovial j.
elbow joint  the articulation between the humerus, ulna, and radius.
ellipsoidal joint  condylar j.
enarthrodial joint  spheroidal j.
facet joints  the articulations of the vertebral column.
false joint  pseudarthrosis.
fibrocartilaginous joint  symphysis.
fibrous joint  a type of synarthrosis in which the bones are united by continuous intervening fibrous tissue.
flail joint  an unusually mobile joint.
ginglymoid joint  ginglymus.
gliding joint  plane j.
hinge joint  ginglymus.
hip joint  the spheroidal joint between the head of the femur and the acetabulum of the hip bone.
immovable joint  fibrous j.
intercarpal joints  the articulations between the carpal bones.
knee joint  the compound joint between the femur, patella, and tibia.
Lisfranc's joint  the articulation between the tarsal and metatarsal bones.
mixed joint  one combining features of different types of joints.
multiaxial joint  spheroidal j.
neurocentral joint  a synchondrosis between the body of a vertebra and either half of the vertebral arch.
peg-and-socket joint  gomphosis.
pivot joint  a uniaxial joint in which one bone pivots within a bony or an osseoligamentous ring.
plane joint  a synovial joint in which the opposed surfaces are flat or only slightly curved.
polyaxial joint  spheroidal j.
rotary joint  pivot j.
saddle joint  one having two saddle-shaped surfaces at right angles to each other.
simple joint  one in which only two bones articulate.
spheroidal joint  ball-and-socket joint; a synovial joint in which a round surface on one bone (“ball”) moves within a concavity (“socket”) on the other bone.
spiral joint  cochlear j.
synarthrodial joint  fibrous j.
synovial joint  diarthrosis; a joint that permits more or less free motion, the union of the bony elements being surrounded by an articular capsule enclosing a cavity lined by synovial membrane.
temporomandibular joint  a bicondylar joint formed by the head of the mandible and the mandibular fossa, and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.
trochoid joint  pivot j.
uniaxial joint  one which permits movement in one axis only.
unilocular joint  a synovial joint having only one cavity.

joint

(joint)
n.
1.
a. A place or part at which two or more things are joined.
b. A way in which two or more things are joined: a mortise-and-tenon joint.
2. Anatomy
a. A point of articulation between two or more bones, especially such a connection that allows motion.
b. A point in the exoskeleton of an invertebrate at which movable parts join, as along the leg of an arthropod.
3. Botany An articulation on a fruit or stem, such as the node of a grass stem.
4. Slang A marijuana cigarette.
adj.
1. Shared by or common to two or more: our joint presence; a joint income-tax return.
2. Sharing with another or others: a joint tenant.
3. Formed or characterized by cooperation or united action: joint military maneuvers.
4. Involving both houses of a legislature: a joint session of Congress.
5. Law Regarded as one, especially with regard to tort liability or interest in property.
6. Mathematics Involving two or more variables.
tr.v. jointed, jointing, joints
1. To combine or attach with a joint or joints: securely jointed the sides of the drawer.
2. To provide or construct with joints: joint a boom on a crane.
3. To separate (meat) at the joints.

joint

Etymology: L, jungere, to join
any one of the articulations between bones. Each is classified according to structure and movability as fibrous, cartilaginous, or synovial. Fibrous joints are immovable, cartilaginous joints are slightly movable, and synovial joints are freely movable. Typical immovable joints are those connecting most of the bones of the skull with a sutural ligament. Typical slightly movable joints are those connecting the vertebrae and the pubic bones. Most of the joints in the body are freely movable and allow gliding, circumduction, rotation, and angular movement. Also called articulation. See also cartilaginous joint, fibrous joint, synovial joint.

joint

Substance abuse A popular term for a cigarette made from dried marijuana, Cannibas sativa leaves, which is 'toked' to produce a 'high' and, if smoked in excess, 'get stoned'. See Hallucinogen, Marijuana, Substance abuse, THC receptor.

joint

(joynt)
ANATOMY The place of union, usually more or less movable, between two or more bones. Joints between skeletal elements exhibit a great variety of form and function, and are classified into three general morphologic types: fibrous joints; cartilaginous joints; and synovial joints.
Synonym(s): arthrosis (1) , articulation (1) , junctura (1) .
[L. junctura; fr. jungo, pp. junctus, to join]

joint

(joynt) [Fr. jointe, fr L. junctio, a joining]
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TYPES OF JOINTS
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TYPES OF JOINTS
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TYPES OF JOINTS
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TYPES OF JOINTS
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TYPES OF JOINTS
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TYPES OF JOINTS
The place where two or more bones meet. Some joints are fixed or immobile attachments of bones; other joints allow the bones to move along each other. A joint usually has a thin, smooth articular cartilage on each bony surface and is enclosed by a joint capsule of fibrous connective tissue. A joint is classified as immovable (synarthrodial), slightly movable (amphiarthrodial), or freely movable (diarthrodial). A synarthrodial joint is one in which the two bones are separated only by an intervening membrane, such as the cranial sutures. An amphiarthrodial joint is one having a fibrocartilaginous disk between the bony surfaces (symphysis), such as the symphysis pubis; or one with a ligament uniting the two bones (syndesmosis), such as the tibiofibular articulation. A diarthrodial joint is one in which the adjoining bone ends are covered with a thin cartilaginous sheet and joined by a joint capsule lined by a synovial membrane, which secretes synovial fluid. Synonym: arthrosis (1) See: illustration

Movement

Joints are also grouped according to their motion: ball and socket (enarthrodial); hinge (ginglymoid); condyloid; pivot (trochoid); gliding (arthrodial); and saddle joint.

Joints can move in four ways: gliding, in which one bony surface glides on another without angular or rotatory movement; angulation, occurring only between long bones, increasing or decreasing the angle between the bones; circumduction, occurring in joints composed of the head of a bone and an articular cavity, the long bone describing a series of circles, the whole forming a cone; and rotation, in which a bone moves about a central axis without moving from this axis. Angular movement, if it occurs forward or backward, is called flexion or extension, respectively; away from the body, abduction; and toward the median plane of the body, adduction.

Because of their location and constant use, joints are prone to stress, injury, and inflammation. The main diseases affecting the joints are rheumatic fever, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and gout. Injuries comprise contusions, sprains, dislocations, and penetrating wounds.

acromioclavicular joint

Abbreviation: AC joint
A gliding or plane joint between the acromion and the acromial end of the clavicle.

amphidiarthrodial joint

A joint that is both ginglymoid and arthrodial.

ankle joint

Ankle.

arthrodial joint

Diarthrosis permitting a gliding motion. Synonym: gliding joint

ball-and-socket joint

A joint in which the round end of one bone fits into the cavity of another bone. Synonym: enarthrodial joint; multiaxial joint; polyaxial joint

biaxial joint

A joint with two chief movement axes at right angles to each other.

bilocular joint

A joint separated into two sections by interarticular cartilage.

bleeders' joint

Hemorrhage into joint space in hemophiliacs. Synonym: hemophilic joint

Budin joint

See: Budin joint

cartilaginous joint

A joint with cartilage between the bones.

Charcot joint

See: Charcot, Jean M.

Chopart joint

See: Chopart, François

Clutton joint

See: Clutton joint

cochlear joint

A hinge joint permitting lateral motion. Synonym: spiral joint

compound joint

A joint made up of several bones.

condylar joint

Ellipsoid joint.

condyloid joint

A joint permitting all forms of angular movement except axial rotation.

cracking joint

The sound produced by forcible movement of a joint by contracting the muscles that contract or extend a joint, esp. the metacarpophalangeal joints. The cause is not known.
See: crepitation

craniomandibular joint

Either of the encapsulated, double synovial joints between the condylar processes of the mandible and the temporal bones of the cranium. The double synovial joints are separated by an articular disk and function as an upper gliding joint and a lower modified hinge or ginglymoid joint.
Synonym: temporomandibular joint See:

diarthrodial joint

A joint characterized by the presence of a cavity within the capsule separating the bones, permitting considerable freedom of movement.

dry joint

Arthritis of the chronic villous type.

elbow joint

The hinge joint between the humerus and the ulna.

ellipsoid joint

A joint with two axes of motion through the same bone.
Synonym: condylar joint

enarthrodial joint

Ball-and-socket joint.

facet joint

Any of the zygapophyseal joints of the vertebral column between the articulating facets of each pair of vertebrae.

false joint

A false joint formation after a fracture.

fibrous joint

Any of the joints connected by fibrous tissue.

flail joint

A joint that is extremely relaxed, the distal portion of the limb being almost beyond the control of the will.

ginglymoid joint

A synovial joint having only forward and backward motion, as a hinge. Synonym: ginglymus See: hinge joint

gliding joint

Arthrodial joint.

hemophilic joint

Bleeders' joint.

hinge joint

a synovial joint in which two bones flex and extend in only one plane, usually because side (collateral) ligaments limit the direction of motion, e.g., elbow joint.

hip joint

A synovial ball-and-socket joint in which the head of the femur fits into the acetabulum of the hip bone. More than seven separate ligaments hold the joint together and restrict its movements.

immovable joint

Synarthrosis.

intercarpal joint

Any of the articulations formed by the carpal bones in relation to one another.

irritable joint

A recurrent joint inflammation of unknown cause.

knee joint

The joint formed by the femur, patella, and tibia.

midcarpal joint

A joint separating the navicular, lunate, and triangular bones from the distal row of carpal bones.

movable joint

A slightly movable or freely movable joint, amphiarthrodial and diarthrodial, respectively.

multiaxial joint

Ball-and-socket joint.

pivot joint

A joint that permits rotation of a bone, the joint being formed by a pivot-like process that turns within a ring, or by a ringlike structure that turns on a pivot. Synonym: rotary joint; trochoid joint

plane joint

A synovial joint between bone surfaces, in which only gliding movements are possible.

polyaxial joint

Ball-and-socket joint.

joint protection

A technique for minimizing stress on joints, including proper body mechanics and the avoidance of continuous weight-bearing or deforming postures.

receptive joint

Saddle joint.

rotary joint

Pivot joint.

sacroiliac joint

The articulation between the sacrum and the ilium of the hip bone. Joint movement is limited because of interlocking of the articular surfaces.

saddle joint

A joint in which the opposing surfaces are reciprocally concavoconvex. Synonym: receptive joint

shoulder joint

The ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and the glenoid cavity of the scapula.

simple joint

A joint composed of two bones.

spheroid joint

A multiaxial joint with spheroid surfaces.

spiral joint

Cochlear joint.

sternoclavicular joint

The joint space between the sternum and the medial extremity of the clavicle.

stiff joint

A joint with reduced mobility.

subtalar joint

Any of the three articular surfaces on the inferior surface of the talus.

sutural joint

An articulation between two cranial or facial bones.

synarthrodial joint

Synarthrosis.

synovial joint

A joint in which the articulating surfaces are separated by synovial fluid.
See: joint for illus

talocrural joint

Ankle.

tarsometatarsal joint

A joint composed of three arthrodial joints, the bones of which articulate with the bases of the metatarsal bones.

temporomandibular joint

Craniomandibular joint.

trochoid joint

Pivot joint.

ulnomeniscal-triquetral joint

The functional articulation of the distal ulna, articular disk, and triquetrum. The disk may subluxate following injury or with arthritis and block supination of the forearm.

uniaxial joint

A joint moving on a single axis.

unilocular joint

A joint with a single cavity.

joint

or

articulation

a contact between two separate bones. There are various types in humans: hinge, e.g. knee, elbow, fingers; ball and socket, e.g. hip; universal, e.g. atlas vertebra; sliding/gliding, e.g. wrist; fixed, e.g. skull sutures; slightly movable: vertebrae.

Joint

The point where bones meet. Arthroscopic surgery is used on joint problems.

joint

skeletal articulation
  • abnormal joint motion increased or decreased range of joint motion (e.g. due to disease, local trauma, pain) leading to abnormal orientation and function of it and adjacent joints

  • joint assessment part of overall musculoskeletal system assessment; joints are assessed for ease, range and quality of motion, signs of local inflammation, presence of crepitus with movement, deformity or malalignment

  • ball-and-socket joint e.g. hip joint, talonavicular joint

  • biaxial joint joint with two axes of motion, e.g. midtarsal joint

  • fibrous joint bones united by fibrous tissue, e.g. inferior tibia and fibula

  • hinge joint ginglymus, e.g. lesser metatarsophalangeal joints

  • joint mice intra-articular loose bodies

  • joint misalignment increasing malalignment of adjacent bones (see Table 1)

  • joint space narrowing loss of normal joint space (e.g. in late-stage arthritis)

  • joint stiffness characteristic feature of joint dysfunction, e.g. intra-articular or local soft-tissue pathology

  • synovial joint joint capsule is lined with synovial membrane and lubricated by synovial fluid

Table 1: Bone modelling
Type of modellingComment
Chondral modelling during bone growthRate of ossification of cartilaginous precursor of bone/articular cartilage/epiphyseal plates depends on imposed load during development
Joint incongruence within normal range: load inequality across articular cartilage causes remodelling and restoration of maximal congruence, via negative-feedback loop
Joint incongruence beyond normal range: load inequality across articular cartilage causes remodelling adapting to abnormal load, and loss of maximal congruence, via positive-feedback loop
Metaphyses and epiphysesWhere abduction and adduction forces about a joint (e.g. knee) are equal, resultant transverse force across the joint is of zero magnitude
Where adductor force > abductor force:
• Soft-tissue anomaly causes soft-tissue positional genu valgum and increases force on lateral articular surface/epiphyseal areas
• Rate of bone growth at lateral areas increases; that of medial areas remains normal
• Joint congruence is restored, and the horizontal force is restored to zero magnitude, but soft-tissue genu valgum deformity persists as bone deformity
Articular surfacesMinor incongruence between articular surfaces within a synovial joint causes large changes in forces acting at different parts of articular surface, e.g.
• Absent subtalar joint inversion/eversion causes trochlear talus to undergo reactive twist within ankle mortise, and compression at articular areas remaining in contact
• Excess loading at these sites reduces local bone growth; unloaded areas continue to grow at normal rate
• Shape of articular surface gradually changes, adapting to abnormal loading pattern, and maximum congruence is achieved, but trochlea becomes rounded (rather than pulley-shaped) and ankle joint forms ball-and-socket, rather than hinge, joint

joint,

n a point of articulation between bones.
joint capsule,
n two-layered structure that surrounds, supports, and lubricates synovial joints.
joint centration (jointˑ sen·trāˑ·shn),
n a neutral positioning of a joint by which maximum equilibrium exists between the surfaces and the tension or length relationships of antagonist muscles are stabilized.
joint kinesthetic receptors (jointˑ kiˈ·nis·theˈ·tik r·sepˈ·terz),
n pressure receptors in the capsules of joints. They are sensitive to the motion, acceleration, and deceleration of the joint.
joint range,
n the complete range of motion measured with a tape measure or a goniometer. In most cases, a practitioner determines the range by visual examination.
joint, ball-and-socket,
n joints such as the coxa or glenohumeral that consist of a knoblike ball of bone rotating in a smooth, concavity of bone, thus allowing full range of movement. Also called
triaxial joint.
joint, sacroiliac (saˈ·krō·iˑ·lē·ak jointˑ),
n the pelvic joint which connects the sacrum and the ilium. It is supported by the hamstring muscles and can be adversely affected by weaknesses or dysfunction in them.
joints, ellipsoidal (iˈ·lip·soiˑ·dl jointsˑ),
n.pl joints similar to the ball and socket joints; allow flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and some rotation. Also called
biaxial or
condyloid joints.
joints, saddle,
n.pl joints that permit all movements with limited rotation. Also called
biaxial joints.

joint

(joynt) [TA]
anatomy Place of union, usually more or less movable, between two or more rigid skeletal components (bones, cartilage, or parts of a single bone). Joints between skeletal elements exhibit a great variety of form and function and are classified into three general morphologic types: fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial.
Synonym(s): articulation (2) .
[L. junctura; fr. jungo, pp. junctus, to join]

joint(s),

n the junction of union between two or more bones or cartilages of the skeleton.
joint(s), Charcot's
n a manifestation of late syphilis in which there is degeneration, hypertrophy, hypermobility, and loss of contour of a joint, usually a weight-bearing joint. It is most common in tabes dorsalis.
joint(s) diarthrosis
n a joint that moves freely in contact. The adjacent bone surfaces are typically covered by a film of cartilage and are bound by stout connective tissues, frequently enclosing a liquid-filled joint cavity.
joint(s) disease,
n an inflammatory, infectious, or functional disorder within a joint.
joint(s), hinge,
joint(s) mice,
n cartilaginous material present in the synovial spaces of a joint.

joint

the site of the junction or union of two or more bones of the body. See also arthritis. The primary functions of joints are to provide motion and flexibility to the skeletal frame, or to allow growth.
Some joints are immovable, such as certain fixed joints where segments of bone are fused together in the skull. Other joints, such as those between the vertebrae, have extremely limited motion. However, most joints allow considerable motion.
Many joints have a complex internal structure. They are composed not merely of ends of bones but also of ligaments, which are tough whitish fibers binding the bones together; cartilage, which is connective tissue, covering and cushioning the bone ends; the articular capsule, a fibrous tissue that encloses the ends of the bones; and the synovial membrane, which lines the capsule and secretes a lubricating fluid (synovia).
Joints are classified by variations in structure that make different kinds of movement possible. The movable joints are usually subdivided into hinge, pivot, gliding, ball-and-socket, condyloid and saddle joints.
For a complete named list of joints in the body see Table 11.

arthrodial joint
gliding joint.
ball-and-socket joint
a synovial joint in which the rounded or spheroidal surface of one bone ('ball') moves within a cup-shaped depression ('socket') on another bone, allowing greater freedom of movement than any other type of joint. Called also spheroidal joint.
biaxial joint
permits movement around two axes.
cartilaginous joint
one in which the bones are united by cartilage, providing either slight flexible movement or allowing growth; it includes symphyses and synchondroses.
condyloid joint
one in which an ovoid head of one bone moves in an elliptical cavity of another, permitting all movements except axial rotation. Called also condylar joint.
congenital joint disease
see articular rigidity, joint hypermobility, arthrogryposis, contracture.
joint contracture
degenerative joint disease
a disease of the joints of all species and all ages but reaching a particularly high prevalence in pen-fed young bulls in which it is characterized by the sudden onset of lameness in a hindlimb, with pain and crepitus in the hip joint and rapid wasting of the muscles of the croup and thigh. There is a family predisposition to this degenerative arthropathy; it is exacerbated by a diet high in phosphorus and low in calcium and dense in energy so that the bull has a high body weight and is growing fast. The onset is acute and often precipitated by fighting or mating. The disease may not develop until 3 or 4 years of age in bulls that are reared at pasture. Called also coxofemoral arthropathy. See also hip dysplasia.
diarthrodial joint
synovial joint.
joint disease
ellipsoid joint
circumference of the joint is an ellipse with the articular surfaces longer in one direction than the other.
joint enlargement
includes arthritis, arthropathy, rickets.
facet j's
the synovial joints of the vertebral column between the neural arches.
fibrocartilaginous joint
a combination of fibrous and cartilaginous joints. Called also amphiarthrosis. Movement limited and variable.
fibrous joint
one in which the bones are connected by fibrous tissue; it includes suture, syndesmosis and gomphosis.
joint fixation
includes ankylosis, tendon contracture, arthrogryposis.
fixed joint
flail joint
an unusually mobile joint.
fleshy joint
joint fusion
arthrodesis.
ginglymus joint
see hinge joint (below).
gliding joint
a synovial joint in which the opposed surfaces are flat or only slightly curved, so that the bones slide against each other in a simple and limited way. The synovial intervertebral joints are gliding joints, and many of the small bones of the carpus and tarsus meet in gliding joints. Called also arthrodial joint and plane joint.
hinge joint
a synovial joint that allows movement in only one plane, through the presence of a pair of collateral ligaments that run on either side of the joint. Examples are the elbow and the interphalangeal joints of the digits. The jaw is primarily a hinge joint, but it can also move somewhat from side to side. The carpal and tarsal joints are hinge joints that also allow some rotary movement. Called also ginglymus.
hip joint
the joint between the head of the femur and the acetabulum of the hip bone; loosely called hip.
hyaline cartilage joint
see cartilaginous joint (above).
joint hyperextension
joint can be extended beyond the normal position.
joint hypermobility
usually a congenital defect with all joints affected. Degree varies from extreme, in which limbs can be tied in knots and animal unable to stand, to mild, in which the patient is able to walk but the gait is abnormal. There may be additional defects such as pink teeth lacking enamel and dermatosparaxis (hyperelastosis cutis). See also hereditary collagen dysplasia.
knee joint
1. the joint between the femur and tibia, fibula and patella.
2. in large ungulates the compound joint between the radius, ulna, carpus and metacarpus.
joint mouse
fragments of cartilage or bone that lie free in the joint space. See also joint mouse.
osseous joint
inflexible joint composed of bone; called also synostosis.
pivot joint
a joint in which one bone pivots within a bony or an osseoligamentous ring, allowing only rotary movement; an example is the joint between the first and second cervical vertebrae (the atlas and axis).
plane joint
see gliding joint (above).
joint receptors
sensory nerve endings capable of detecting the position or angle of the joint.
saddle joint
the articulating surfaces are reciprocally saddle-shaped and permit movement of all kinds, though not rotation, e.g. interphalangeal joints in the dog.
spheroidal joint
see ball-and-socket joint (above).
synarthrodial joint
a fixed joint.
synovial joint
a specialized form of articulation permitting more or less free movement, the union of the bony elements being surrounded by an articular capsule enclosing a cavity lined by synovial membrane. Called also diarthrosis and diarthrodial joint.
trochoid joint
see pivot joint (above).
uniaxial joint
permits movement in one direction only.

Patient discussion about joint

Q. I’ve been having joint pain for the last two months or so, do I have arthritis? I’m a 32 year old dancer, and those pain affects my work and my life.. What can it be and what can I do with it? Is there a way to ease the pain?

A. As a former gymnast and international coach(German Olympic Team) I was having severe pain, Turns out I have fibromialgia ,MS and cronic fatigue.
I have a pain combination that includes an anti dpressant(light)Opana,and a parkinsons med as well as a breakthrough pain med.... works and so can I,limited but almost pain free.

Q. What is the treatment for "hip joint mice"? Thanks!

A. if you are young- it goes away by itself after 6-8 painful weeks...if you are older you might need a surgery to remove the particles. it the hip bone it can be complicated, so it's really up to your Dr. to decide what to do here.

Q. Past few months from now my mom is facing a severe pain in the joints of her ankle.not even able to walk now Hi All, Something happened like this my mom was attacked by sever cough and an x-ray was taken and Doctors confirmed that there was some infection in lugs and it got cured.Later she got fever and after few days wen fever went off she found it difficult to move bcz of swelling in her ankle and tightened joints,large pain when tried to walk and a bit of swellin in figures too.Am very much confused abt wat this disease is and y is this happened suddenly. Is der any disease vch can bring down the mobility in one week. Doctors at my place are completely ignorant abt such situation and are claiming this can not be cured and should be faced through out the life. I took my mom to a good city hospital and Doctors here have categorized it as Rheumatoid arithritis. Am really worried and completely ignorant abt this Kindly help me.

A. If it started after lung infection, than the joint pain may represent "reactive arthritis" after pneumonia due to Chlamydophila (a bacteria that cause inflammation of the joints after it cause lung infection).

You may try to read more about it here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000440.htm
However, it's only a suggestion - you may want to consult someone more professional.

More discussions about joint