marsupial

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Related to Carnivorous marsupial: dasyurid

mar·su·pi·al

(mar-sū'pē-ăl),
1. A member of the order Marsupalia, which includes such mammals as kangaroos, wombats, bandicoots, and opossums, the female of which has an abdominal pouch for carrying the young.
2. Of or pertaining to marsupials.
[L. marsupium, a pouch]

marsupial

(mär-so͞o′pē-əl)
n.
Any of various nonplacental mammals of the infraclass Metatheria, including kangaroos, opossums, bandicoots, and wombats, found principally in Australia and the Americas, and typically bearing young that suckle and develop after birth in the mother's pouch. These species were formerly placed in the order Marsupialia.
adj.
1. Of or belonging to the infraclass Metatheria.
2. Relating to or having a marsupium.

marsupial

adjective Referring to a pouch.

noun Any pouched mammal of the order Marsupialia.

marsupial

any member of the subclass Marsupialia (also called Didelphia or Metatheria) containing mammals characterized by the absence of a placenta and the presence of a pouch to which the young, born in an undeveloped state, migrate during early development. The pouch contains the mammary glands, which vary in number between species, and the young complete their development here. The group was at one time widespread, but now is restricted to Australasia and South America. In Australasia, marsupials, free from competition from EUTHERIAN (placental) mammals, have radiated to occupy most niches elsewhere occupied by placental forms.

marsupial

an animal member of the order Marsupiala, infraclass Metatheria, which produces viviparous young by hatching eggs internally. The bean-sized fetus is transferred to the characteristic marsupial pouch on the anterior abdomen with its mammary gland and reared there. Two monotremes, the platypus and the spiny anteater, lay and hatch eggs and rear the young, the latter in rudimentary marsupial pouches.

carnivorous marsupial
References in periodicals archive ?
The Marsupial Lion is an extinct species of a carnivorous marsupial mammal that lived in Australia from the early to the late Pleistocene (1,600,000-46,000 years ago).
It is the world's largest carnivorous marsupial but is being hit by a facial tumour disease caught by sharing food
Aggressive Research Program To Save The Tassie Devil Launched: The world's largest surviving carnivorous marsupial, the Tasmanian Devil, is in danger of extinction from a facial tumor disease.
Re-establishing shelter on the reserves through the removal of cattle and camels, burning in a mosaic pattern, and controlling cats and foxes will go a long way to ensure the survival of species like the vulnerable Mulgara (a small but feisty carnivorous marsupial mouse).