caregiver

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caregiver

 [kār´giv″er]
a lay individual who assumes responsibility for the physical and emotional needs of another who is incapable of self care. See also caregiver role fatigue and caregiver role strain. Called also caretaker.

caregiver

(kâr′gĭv′ər)
n.
1. An individual, such as a physician, nurse, or social worker, who assists in the identification, prevention, or treatment of an illness or disability.
2. An individual, such as a family member or guardian, who takes care of a child or dependent adult.

care′giv′ing adj. & n.

caregiver

one who contributes the benefits of medical, social, economic, or environmental resources to a dependent or partially dependent individual, such as a critically ill person.

caregiver

Health care The person–eg, a family member or a designated HCW–who cares for a Pt with Alzheimer's disease, other form of dementia or chronic debilitating disease requiring provision of nonmedical protective and supportive care

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
1. General term for a physician, nurse, or other health care practitioner who cares for patients.
2. Any person, including a family member, who provides care or assistance to one who is ill.

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
General term for a physician, nurse, other health care practitioner, or family member/friend who cares for patients.

caregiver,

n a person providing treatment or support to a sick, disabled, or dependent individual.

Patient discussion about caregiver

Q. what have been some of the hardest things you've experienced as a parent or caregiver of an autistic child? I would like a point of view of someone with experience so I’ll now what to expect later in life.

A. The hardest thing that I experience as a parent is the ignorance from others who just don't know what autism is, how to handle it, and how rude and dysfunctional they are being towards my child without realizing it, even so called experts like educators and doctors.

More discussions about caregiver
References in periodicals archive ?
Suppliers should consider caregiver needs across multiple disease states and look for ways to conveniently position products and market them toward caregivers in a retail setting.
As the baby boomer generation ages and faces longer life expectancies, the need for family caregivers increases significantly.
While in Wausau, Senator Baldwin met with local Wisconsinites who have spent time caring for loved ones, as well as representatives from AARP Wisconsin, to share how this bipartisan law will begin to support the needs of family caregivers in Wisconsin and across the country.
A team at the Los Angeles-based research center based the report on a survey of 3,183 non-professional family caregivers conducted earlier this year.
Conclusion: Anxiety and depression were indentified in the caregivers of schizophrenia patients.
All caregivers of functionally impaired elderly registered at home health care services were included in this study.
In recognition of the very important role of caregivers in national development, policies in the practice of the caregiving profession must be instituted to protect our caregivers from abuse, harassment, violence and economic exploitation,' Roman said in the bill.
If the patient later becomes competent, he must be provided with the opportunity to add, change, or remove designated caregivers.
Depression among family caregivers is a "specific emotional reaction to the stress of caregiving" (Sherwood et al.
If 10 percent of all workers are caregivers, and 10 percent of the caregivers find that caregiving affects about 10 percent of their time at work, then the new survey data suggest that caregiving might be lowering the value of about $70 billion of employers' spending on wages and salaries.
Firstly, caregivers are sometimes referred to as "secondary patients", who need and deserve protection and guidance--their caregiving demands place them at high risk for injury and adverse events.
Post-9/11 military caregivers differ from other caregivers: They make up almost 20% of all military caregivers, tend to be younger and care for younger individuals disconnected to a support network.