coronary circulation

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coronary circulation

Movement of blood through the vessels of the heart, specifically from the ascending aorta to the epicardial coronary arteries to the penetrating arteries of the myocardium, the coronary arterioles, capillaries, veins, coronary sinus, and into the right atrium. A few of the small veins open directly into the atria and ventricles.
See: illustration
See also: circulation


movement in a regular or circuitous course, returning to the point of origin, as the circulation of the blood through the heart and blood vessels. See also circulatory system.

antegrade circulation
circulation in the normal direction of flow.
artificial circulation
is maintained in cardiopulmonary arrest by cardiac compression.
collateral circulation
circulation carried on through secondary channels after obstruction of the principal channel supplying the part.
coronary circulation
that within the coronary vessels, which supply the muscle of the heart.
cutaneous circulation
cutaneous vessels are innervated by sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstrictor fibers; vasodilation is an important mechanism for losing heat after the body has been warmed.
enterohepatic circulation
the cycle in which bile salts and other substances excreted by the liver in the bile are absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and returned to the liver via the portal circulation.
extracorporeal circulation
circulation of blood outside the body, as through a hemodialyzer or an extracorporeal circulatory support unit.
fetal circulation
circulation of blood through the body of the fetus and to and from the placenta through the umbilical cord. See also fetal circulation.
hepatic circulation
includes the hepatic arterial blood supply and the supply from the portal vein; drainage is via the hepatic veins to the caudal vena cava.
lymph circulation
see lymph.
maternal circulation
the circulation of the dam during pregnancy, including especially that of the uterus.
neonatal circulation
circulation in the newborn immediately after birth; the umbilical vessels contract forcing blood into the fetal veins; the foramen ovale closes, the ductus arteriosus narrows and eventually closes at day 1 to 2 after birth.
ocular circulation
consists of the uveal and retinal blood vessels supported by the aqueous humor and vitreous body.
placental circulation
consists of the umbilical arteries, the vessels of the placenta proper and the umbilical veins; approximates the fetal corporeal circulation in volume.
portal circulation
a general term denoting the circulation of blood through larger vessels from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and spleen through the portal vein to the liver.
pulmonary circulation
the flow of blood from the right ventricle through the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where carbon dioxide is exchanged for oxygen, and back through the pulmonary vein to the left atrium. See also pulmonary circulation.
splenic circulation
flow of blood through the splenic artery and arterioles to either the capillaries, e. g. white pulp, or the highly permeable sinuses of the red pulp. Splenic venous blood drains into the portal vein and passes through the liver before re-entering the general circulation.
systemic circulation
the flow of blood from the left ventricle through the aorta, carrying oxygen and nutrient material to all the tissues of the body, and returning through the superior and inferior venae cavae to the right atrium.
circulation time
the time required for blood to flow between two given points. It is determined by injecting a substance into a vein and then measuring the time required for it to reach a specific site.
References in periodicals archive ?
This edition has CT imaging of the chest and abdomen in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes; a new foldout of pulmonary and hepatic segments and lymph node stations; more on vascular imaging studies in chapters on special MR examinations and MR angiography; more detail on image labels; and international classifications of the American Heart Association for cardiac vessels and the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control for lung cancer and mediastinal lymph nodes.
The company said the system helps physicians determine the most appropriate location for left-ventricular lead placement by generating 3-D images of the cardiac veins; enhanced software for the system will be commercially available later this year that also analyzes the motion of select cardiac vessels on the left side of the heart.
Q: My heart catheterization was normal, other than "very tortuous cardiac vessels.
Coronary lesions in at least two of the three major cardiac vessels have narrowings of greater than or equal to 50 percent by visual assessment.
In addition, researchers will investigate the sensitivity of the advanced technology to identify the involvement of specific cardiac vessels in ischemic events.