squamous cell carcinoma

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carcinoma

 [kahr″sĭ-no´mah] (pl. carcinomas, carcino´mata)
a malignant new growth made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate surrounding tissues and to give rise to metastases. A form of cancer, carcinoma makes up the majority of the cases of malignancy of the breast, uterus, intestinal tract, skin, and tongue.
adenocystic carcinoma (adenoid cystic carcinoma) carcinoma marked by cylinders or bands of hyaline or mucinous stroma separated or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells, occurring in the mammary and salivary glands, and mucous glands of the respiratory tract. Called also cylindroma.
alveolar carcinoma bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.
basal cell carcinoma the most common form of skin cancer, consisting of an epithelial tumor of the skin originating from neoplastic differentiation of basal cells, rarely metastatic but locally invasive and aggressive. It usually occurs as small pearly nodules or plaques on the face of an older adult, particularly on a sun-exposed area of someone with fair skin. It has been divided into numerous subtypes on the basis of clinical and histological characteristics.
basosquamous carcinoma carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements.
bronchioalveolar carcinoma (bronchiolar carcinoma) (bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) (bronchoalveolar carcinoma) a variant type of adenocarcinoma of the lung, with columnar to cuboidal epithelial cells lining the alveolar septa and projecting into alveolar spaces in branching papillary formations. Called also alveolar carcinoma or adenocarcinoma and bronchiolar, bronchioloalveolar, or bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma.
bronchogenic carcinoma any of a large group of carcinomas of the lung, so called because they arise from the epithelium of the bronchial tree. Four primary subtypes are distinguished: adenocarcinoma of the lung, large cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.
cholangiocellular carcinoma a rare type of hepatocellular carcinoma arising from the cholangioles, consisting of two layers of cells surrounding a minute lumen. Called also bile duct carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma.
chorionic carcinoma choriocarcinoma.
colloid carcinoma mucinous carcinoma.
cylindrical cell carcinoma carcinoma in which the cells are cylindrical or nearly so.
embryonal carcinoma a highly malignant germ cell tumor that is a primitive form of carcinoma, probably of primitive embryonal cell derivation; it usually arises in a gonad and may be found either in pure form or as part of a mixed germ cell tumor.
epidermoid carcinoma squamous cell carcinoma.
giant cell carcinoma a poorly differentiated, highly malignant, epithelial neoplasm containing many large multinucleated tumor cells, such as occurs in the lungs.
hepatocellular carcinoma primary carcinoma of the liver cells with hepatomegaly, jaundice, hemoperitoneum, and other symptoms of the presence of an abdominal mass. It is rare in North America and Western Europe but is one of the most common malignancies in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and elsewhere. A strong association seems to exist with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.
Hürthle cell carcinoma a malignant Hürthle cell tumor.
carcinoma in si´tu a neoplasm whose tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane; the likelihood of subsequent invasive growth is presumed to be high.
large cell carcinoma a type of bronchogenic carcinoma of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size, a variety of squamous cell carcinoma that has undergone further dedifferentiation.
medullary carcinoma that composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma.
mucinous carcinoma an adenocarcinoma that produces significant amounts of mucin.
nasopharyngeal carcinoma a malignant tumor arising in the epithelial lining of the nasopharynx, occurring at high frequency in people of Chinese descent. The epstein-barr virus has been implicated as a causative agent.
non–small cell carcinoma a general term comprising all lung carcinomas except small cell carcinoma, and including adenocarcinoma of the lung, large cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.
oat cell carcinoma a form of small cell carcinoma in which the cells are round or elongated and slightly larger than lymphocytes; they have scanty cytoplasm and clump poorly.
papillary carcinoma carcinoma in which there are papillary growths that are irregular in nature arising from otherwise normal tissue; it can occur in the thyroid gland, the breast, or the bladder. Called also papillocarcinoma.
renal cell carcinoma carcinoma of the renal parenchyma, composed of tubular cells in varying arrangements; called also clear cell carcinoma.
scirrhous carcinoma carcinoma with a hard structure owing to the formation of dense connective tissue in the stroma. Called also fibrocarcinoma.
carcinoma sim´plex an undifferentiated carcinoma.
small cell carcinoma a common, highly malignant form of bronchogenic carcinoma in the wall of a major bronchus, occurring mainly in middle-aged individuals with a history of tobacco smoking; it is radiosensitive and has small oval undifferentiated cells. Metastasis to the hilum and to mediastinal lymph nodes is common.
spindle cell carcinoma squamous cell carcinoma marked by development of rapidly proliferating spindle cells.
squamous cell carcinoma
1. carcinoma developed from squamous epithelium, having cuboid cells and characterized by keratinization. Initially local and superficial, the lesion may later invade and metastasize.
2. the form occurring in the skin, usually originating in sun-damaged areas or preexisting lesions.
3. in the lung, one of the most common types of bronchogenic carcinoma, generally forming polypoid or sessile masses that obstruct the airways of the bronchi. It usually occurs in middle-aged individuals with a history of smoking. There is frequent invasion of blood and lymphatic vessels with metastasis to regional lymph nodes and other sites. Called also epidermoid carcinoma.
transitional cell carcinoma a malignant tumor arising from a transitional type of stratified epithelium, usually affecting the urinary bladder.
verrucous carcinoma
1. a variety of squamous cell carcinoma that has a predilection for the buccal mucosa but also affects other oral soft tissue and the larynx. It is slow-growing and somewhat invasive.
2. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor, so called because it is histologically similar to the oral lesion.

squa·mous cell car·ci·no·ma

a malignant neoplasm derived from stratified squamous epithelium, but that may also occur in sites such as bronchial mucosa where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present; variable amounts of keratin are formed, in relationship to the degree of differentiation, and, if the keratin is not on the surface, it may accumulate in the neoplasm as a keratin pearl; in instances in which the cells are well differentiated, intercellular bridges may be observed between adjacent cells.

squamous cell carcinoma

n.
A carcinoma that arises from squamous epithelium. It is the most common form of skin cancer and can also develop in the lungs and other organs.

squamous cell carcinoma

a slow-growing malignant tumor of squamous epithelium, frequently found in the lungs and skin and occurring also in the anus, cervix, larynx, nose, and bladder. The neoplastic cells characteristically resemble prickle cells and form keratin pearls. Although oral cancer is rare (less than 3% of all cancers), 94% of oral malignancies are squamous cell carcinoma. It may appear as a keratotic plaque; a crusted or noncrusted ulcer; a slightly raised lesion with central ulceration and a rolled border; a red, white or red/white combination velvety area; invasive or burrowing into oral tissues; or a verruciform (multilobulated) growth. The most common intraoral site is the tongue, followed in descending frequency by the soft palate, gingiva, buccal mucosa, labial mucosa, and the hard palate. Lesions may metastasize through the lymph nodes. Treatment and prognosis varies according to site, size and stage of disease progression. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to increase survival rates. Also called epidermoid carcinoma.
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Squamous cell carcinoma

squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell cancer  Oncology A malignant epithelial neoplasm that arises in squamous cells of skin, hollow organs, respiratory and GI mucosa, either de novo or in actinic keratosis, or other lesions; SCCs have a high cure rate if treated early; 90+% occur on skin regularly exposed to sunlight or other UV radiation; SCC is more common in Pts with a genetic predisposition, especially those with light skin–↓ melanin in skin and eyes, exposure to chemicals, radiation, arsenic–present in some herbicides; SCC is more aggressive than BCC and carries a slight risk of metastasis if untreated for a long period of time Clinical Asymptomatic early, pain if ulcerated. See Actinic keratosis, Basal cell carcinoma, Skin cancer.

squa·mous cell car·ci·no·ma

(skwā'mŭs sel kahr'si-nō'mă)
A malignant neoplasm derived from stratified squamous epithelium, which may also occur in sites where only glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present.
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SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

squamous cell carcinoma

Carcinoma that develops primarily from squamous cells, e.g., of the skin or in the mouth, lungs, bronchi, esophagus, or cervix. Synonym: epidermoid carcinoma See: illustration
illustrationillustration
See also: carcinoma

squamous cell carcinoma

A form of skin cancer related to sunlight exposure. A squamous cell cancer starts as small, firm, painless lumps occurring most commonly on the lip, ear, or back of the hand and slowly enlarging. Surgical removal and examination is important as, unlike the rodent ulcer (BASAL CELL CARCINOMA), this tumour may spread to other parts of the body, with fatal consequences.

squamous cell carcinoma

rapidly growing, aggressive, nodular, skin tumour which may ulcerate and can metastasize; occurs predominantly on sun-exposed skin areas (e.g. lips/ears) of older people; also arises in areas of chronic inflammation, or in immunocompromised patients (e.g. renal transplant patients); treated by excision or radiotherapy, with biopsy of local lymph glands (see Table 1)
Table 1: Nail conditions that respond to topical medicaments
Nail conditionTopical medicament
Thickened nail plateSoftened with:
Keratolytics, e.g. 40% urea cream, 12% salicylic acid in collodion
Emollients, e.g. lanolin
Onychophosis or impacted debris in the nail sulcusRevealed by industrial methylated spirit (IMS) or isopropyl alcohol flooded into sulcus
Softened by 10 vol hydrogen peroxide, left in situ for 10 minutes
Relaxed, rubbery or soft nail sulcusAstringents, e.g. 20% silver nitrate solution, weak ferric chloride solution, 3% salicylic acid in IMS, 10% formalin solution
Inflamed sulcusHamamelis water, Burow's solution
Hypergranulation tissueApplication of astringents, e.g. 50% silver nitrate solution, strong ferric chloride solution, 80% (liquefied) phenol for 1 minute, followed by IMS lavage

squa·mous cell car·ci·no·ma

(skwā'mŭs sel kahr'si-nō'mă)
A malignant neoplasm derived from stratified squamous epithelium, but that may also occur in sites such as bronchial mucosa where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present.

squamous

scaly or platelike.

squamous bone
the pars squamosa, or squamous portion of the temporal bone.
squamous cell carcinoma
a carcinoma arising from squamous epithelium; relatively common, locally invasive and occasionally metastatic. In animals they occur on the conjunctiva, the mouth, salivary duct, stomach, trachea and bronchi, prostate, penis, prepuce, vulva, urinary bladder and skin. See also specific organ locations.
squamous eddy
a common histological pattern in neoplastic and hyperplastic epidermal disorders. They are whorl-like patterns of squamoid cells.
squamous metaplasia
affected cells are converted to a squamous stratified type from the surface of which squames are shed.
ocular squamous cell carcinoma
that arising from squamous epithelium and having cuboid cells. Squamous cell carcinoma around the eye, also known as cancer eye, is a common neoplasm in cattle, especially those breeds with little pigment in the eyelids. Sunlight, viruses, skin pigmentation and heredity are all thought to be involved in causing the disease. Lesions begin on the third eyelid, unpigmented eyelid or vascular cornea. They are fungating masses of tissue, usually ulcerated, necrotic and apparently painful. They grow rapidly and commonly invade the local lymph nodes. Similar lesions occur on the eyeball and eyelid of the horse. What makes the cattle disease so remarkable is the high prevalence rate. Called also cancer eye.
Squamous cell carcinomas are among the most common skin tumors in dogs and cats. They are particularly common in sun-exposed areas of skin such as the pinnae, eyelids or noses of white cats. Tumors are locally invasive and slow to metastasize.
squamous papilloma
the common papilloma in all species except cattle and deer. Composed largely of epithelial tissue in contrast to fibropapillomas but many lesions are intermediate in type.
squamous pearl
see horn pearls.

Patient discussion about squamous cell carcinoma

Q. what is the most accurate pathological test to identify the primary source of a cystic mass in the neck? the mass was removed. Pathologist was unable to identify the source and diagnosed the mass as a branchilogic carcinmoa (which is extremely rare, if exists at all). Therefore, I am looking for the most updated test and examinations that can be applied to blocks of the mass and determine their origin (primary source)

A. Pathologic examinaions under a microscope are the most accurate ones there are, and sometimes even they don't help to identify the cell types. I do not have any other ideas on other tests you can do, and I believe you should follow the treatment your doctors will advise you based on this diagnosis they have made.

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