carbocation

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car·bon·i·um

(kar-bon'ē-ŭm),
An organic cation in which the positive charge is on a carbon atom;,for example, (CH3)+. It is now recommended that carbocation be used as the class name and carbenium for specific compound names.

carbocation

An often reactive anion with a positively charged carbon that has six electrons in its outer valence shell—i.e., it is missing two electrons that would ensure maximum stability.
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He began to investigate these steps more formally about six years ago, eventually unravelling the details of carbocation dynamics.
The amount of chemical bond formation was the highest for the chloro-hydrocarbon groups that are capable of stabilizing carbocations.
Its biosynthesis involves the reaction of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol pyrophosphate (7) to generate a transient allylic cation intermediate (8), which rapidly reacts with the electron-rich 3-methyl-3-buene-1-ol pyrophosphate (9) to form a carbon-carbon chemical bond and a second carbocation intermediate (10).
may indicate a greater usefulness for the carbocations generated from
McClelland's research has run the gambit from physical organic chemistry, where his group pioneered the direct study of reactive intermediates of the tetrahedral intermediate and carbocation class, to biological and medicinal organic chemistry, where his group examined the properties of several important classes of drugs.
This research group (with Alan Hopkinson) is also actively investigating destabilized carbocations.
His most recent efforts have been directed towards solid-state NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies of isolable carbocations, the thermal and photochemistry of iminium salts related to the visual pigments, and the use of photochemical methods for the fabrication of charge-mosaic piezodialysis membranes.
eq 18 probably via the formation of incipient carbocations.
But the silicon cation proved more difficult to make than the carbocation.