carbocation


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

car·bon·i·um

(kar-bon'ē-ŭm),
An organic cation in which the positive charge is on a carbon atom;,for example, (CH3)+. It is now recommended that carbocation be used as the class name and carbenium for specific compound names.

carbocation

An often reactive anion with a positively charged carbon that has six electrons in its outer valence shell—i.e., it is missing two electrons that would ensure maximum stability.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It turns out that particular meso-PCP+ structures involving primary carbocations are what slow down the chain-branching steps.
These chemical reactions would involve the formation of transient carbocation intermediates.
This, and our detection of rearranged products (equation 2) suggest that the mechanism could involve either 1) elimination followed by addition of water and then another elimination, 2) elimination followed by protonation to form a different carbocation which then eliminates, or 3) a mechanism that is more "E2-lik e" for the stereoisomer which readily exists in an anti-periplanar conformation while the other stereoisomer reacts by a more "E1-like" mechanism.
The highly reactive carbocation -- an intermediate in many organic and biological processes - has helped researchers probe the mechanisms behind chemical reactions.
Other peculiar advantages are he low toxicity and viscosity of the vinyl ether monomer nd the absence of oxygen inhibition, which can be xplained by the lack of reactivity of the propagating carbocation toward oxygen.
The nitrogen stabilized carbocation is the conjugate acid of the imine and transfer of the hydrogen atom, attached to the nitrogen, to water yields the imine.
McClelland's research has run the gambit from physical organic chemistry, where his group pioneered the direct study of reactive intermediates of the tetrahedral intermediate and carbocation class, to biological and medicinal organic chemistry, where his group examined the properties of several important classes of drugs.
The reaction occurs in three steps: (1) a carbocation is formed through the reaction of halogenated alkane with aluminium chloride; (2) the carbocation (acting as an electrophile) hits the benzene ring to form an arenium ion; (3) the arenium ion loses a proton to produce the alkylated benzene.
The rearrangement most likely occurs from the non-classical carbocation intermediate of the first reaction.
In fact the co-condensation proceeds as electrophilic substitution by carbocation, sources of which can be MCL or ether, or both.