carbapenem


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carbapenem

(kahr-bă-pen'em),
Member of a class of antibiotic drugs that works by inhibiting cell wall synthesis.

carbapenem

(kär′bə-pĕn′əm)
n.
Any of several semisynthetic or synthetic beta-lactam antibiotics that are used chiefly to treat serious infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics.

carbapenem

A class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of action against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic germs. The carbapenems include imipenem and meropenem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of great concern is the over-use of carbapenems in hospitals for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, which is contributing to the increasing emergence of carbapenem resistance.
However, ESBLs and AmpC can confer carbapenem resistance when associated with alteration or loss of porins, a family of proteins on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria (2,5).
Non-plasmid mediated carbapenem resistance, while serious, is not as easily transferrable, although treatment of the infected patient and infection control are important regardless of CRE mechanism.
A second carbapenem resistance gene, NDM-1, was identified in 2006 in New Delhi, India.
The publication of the toolkit on how to manage a particular type of antibiotic resistant bacteria called carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae which is an area of concern as bacteria with this mechanism are resistant to carbapenem antibiotics which are those usually used as last resort .
According to the researchers "AMA, extracted from a strain of Aspergillus versicolor and combined with a carbapenem antibiotic, inactivated the NDM-1 gene in three drug-resistant superbugs-Enterobacteriaceae, a group of bacteria that includes E.
According to the report, resistance to the treatment of last resort for life- threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumonia -- carbapenem antibiotics -- has spread to the entire world.
Key findings from the report included that resistance to the treatment of last resort for life-threatening infections caused by a common intestinal bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenem antibiotics has spread to all regions of the world.
Prof Neil Woodford, of Public Health England, said: "KPC is one of a number of enzymes that can make a bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics.
Carbapenem are potent agents for the treatment of this pathogen.