canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
By the time the theologians joined the discussion, the matter had been settled by the canonists and popularized by the manuals of medieval pastoralia.
The canonists contended that a wife was not amenable to rape because a woman gave her consent to any future sexual relations when she agreed to marry.
The act and the meaning of marriage weigh heavily upon the minds of twelfth-century canonists.
The conservative canonists have a response to this: issue the same hymnal and do away with hyphenated self-characterizations.
This legislative activity forced the canonists to concentrate on the question of the ultimate source of law much more thoroughly than the Romanists (pp.
Besides the comments of the canonists, such an explicit assertion of her consent is found to my knowledge in only one other account: the allegorized version of the story in the preaching collection known as the Gesta Romanorum, where Lucretia is the fallen soul who "consents" to sin but then is moved to pierce itself with the "sword of penance.
We lie flatout to ourselves ff we deny a connection between several of the biggest canonists and the fact of to whom they're committed in bed, in head, and for daily bread.
religious congregations have no canonists to turn to who's a specialist on the whole issue of consecrated life," said Gallagher.
In fact, the premodern Scholastic authors (theologians, canonists, philosophers) generated a coherent structure encompassing a religious vision of the human being and his transcendental end, philosophical theories (mainly theories of justice and virtue), and a juridical corpus (canon and civil laws) that proved to be of remarkable significance for the history of private law but is still relevant and provides innovative insights in our current age.
The origin of the theme of vengeance is found in the interpretations offered by canonists and the Bible, predominantly in the Old Testament and also, significantly, in the New Testament (for example, Romans 13.
Instead he introduces readers to such figures as the canonists Peter von Osterwald and Josef Pehem, the philosopher Mattaus Fingerlos, and the historian Michael Ignaz Schmidt--hardly household names, even for students of the German Enlightenment.
Macy's arguments about how even the role of abbesses came to be reduced by the combined assemblage of university-trained canonists, theologians, philosophers, and popes are compelling.