Canon of Medicine

Canon of Medicine

Herbal medicine
A 131-work collection of medical thought based on the Greek writings of Aristotle, Dioscorides, Galen, Hippocrates and others, written by Persian philosopher Avicenna (980–1037).
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His most famous works are The Book of Healing, a philosophical and scientific encyclopedia, and The Canon of Medicine, a medical encyclopedia that became a standard medical text at many medieval universities and remained in use as late as 1650.
Ibn Sina's two most important works are The Book of Healing and The Canon of Medicine.
Which Iranian-born physician composed both the Book of Healing and The Canon of Medicine, among some of the most famous books in the history of medicine?
Iran's Avicenna's Medical Encyclopaedia The Canon of Medicine was highlighted in the program's previous edition.
Included in the 14 manuscripts was the Canon of Medicine, by Ibn Sina; the third chapter of Sahih al-Bukhari; and a manuscript by the scholar Mohammed bin Ibrahim Al-Murtada, dating back to the year 1414.
The outstanding scientific work of the time was Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.
Known in the West by the Latinized version of his name, Avicenna, Ibn Sina wrote treatises such as "The Book of Healing" and "The Canon of Medicine," as well as a vast scientific encyclopedia.
Canon of Medicine is actually his most well-known book.
The evolving scientific knowledge of the Islamic world is much in evidence with a superb collection of astrolabes, as well as several pages of the celebrated The Canon of Medicine written by Avicenna (Ibn Sina 983-1037), which was considered the definitive medical reference until the 17th century.
His al-Qanun fi ilm at-tibb, or Canon of Medicine, was published in the first half of the 11th century and translated into Latin in the early 16th century.
Ibn Sina's book that distinguished him in the field of medicine Canon of Medicine was an Arabic book.
Toward the end of the 12th century, translations from Arabic to Latin of such works as the Canon of Medicine (Ibn Sina, also known as Avicenna; 980-1037) and the Comprehensive Book on Medicine (al-Razi, also known as Rhazes; 865-923) laid the foundation for the development of "Western" medicine in Europe.