Canada

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Can·a·da

(kan'ă-dă),
Wilma J., 20th-century U.S. radiologist. See: Cronkhite-Canada syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photographs of their exhibitionist performances of popular Canadianism seemed designed to provide a symbolic sense of unity and feel good ambience.
See Gauvreau, The Catholic Origins of Quebec's Quiet Revolution, 1931-1970 (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005), 9-12, 23; Terence Fay, A History of Canadian Catholics: Gallicanism, Romanism and Canadianism (Montreal and Kingston: McGill- Queen's University Press, 2002), 202-208, 238-239; Gregory Baum, Catholics and Canadian Socialism: Political Thought in the Thirties and Forties (Toronto: J.
If the participant offered a correct (or even approximately correct) explanation of the Canadianism, one mark was awarded.
current concept of multiculturalism and hyphenated Canadianism pursued by the Government of Canada.
One should not, however, be misled into thinking that a city captured in a variety of ways by a variety of filmmakers results in some sort of unified totality--a new Canadianism that is as unitary as the nationalist-realist ideology.
Young, "Chauvinism and Canadianism," in On Guard for Thee; John Herd Thompson, Ethnic Minorities During Two Worm Wars (Ottawa 1991).
The report notes the emergence in the United States of a worrisome anti- Canadianism, but the problem "pales beside the disturbing and persistent currents of anti-Americanism in Canada.
Terence Fay, A history of Canadian Catholics, Gallicanism, Romanism, and Canadianism.
This is an event that will take its place as another major landmark in the development of a strong Canadianism.
Where they succeeded, their weaker brethren may succumb to the blows of circumstances and it is the part of good Imperialism and good Canadianism to make it easier for such to secure a footing.
Nor is it uncommon for minority heritage politicians to disavow any transnational, distinct or even hyphenated identity in favour of an unabashed assertion of Canadianism.

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