Canadian Institutes of Health Research


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Canadian Institutes of Health Research

,

CIHR, CIHR-IRSC

The Canadian government's federal agency that funds and oversees scientific research into diseases, health outcomes, and health technologies. The French Canadian version is Instituts de recherche en Santé du Canada, abbreviated IRSC. Its website is http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca.
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2] Professor, Department of Urology, Queen's University and Tier 1 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Canada Research Chair in Urologic Pain and Inflammation, Kingston, ON
No one policy governs RCR in all sectors, but notwithstanding the decentralized nature of the Canadian system, the non-governmental sector of research, which includes universities, colleges, hospitals and other institutions, is governed under the policy coordination of the three federal granting agencies: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), collectively referred to as the Tri-Agenciesi (iii).
Canadians will benefit from new insights into the link between physical activity and health as the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Minister of Health, today announced funding for four research teams through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).
5 million from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada's agency responsible for funding health research in the country, and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Health.
Presentations addressed the strategic plans for various organizations, including ADHA, the Canadian Dental Hygienists' Association, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Healthy People 2020 and NIDCR.
The Federal Government earlier this year also announced budget cuts to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the three main sources of research grants in Canada.
Ahmed El-Sohemy, a University of Toronto associate professor funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research who has studied caffeine and health.
Study co-author and recent Queen's doctoral graduate Lilia Antonova was also supported by a Foundation fellowship and a training award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
The program is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

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