Campylobacter


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Campylobacter

 [kam´pĭ-lo-bak″ter]
a genus of gram-negative, microaerophilic to anaerobic, motile, curved or spiral rod-shaped bacteria, found in the oral cavity, intestinal tract, and reproductive organs of humans and animals. Certain subspecies of C. fe´tus are agents of acute gastroenteritis and can cause systemic infection in immunocompromised persons. C. pylo´ri is now known as Helicobacter pylori.

Campylobacter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'ter),
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonsporeforming, spiral or S-curved rods with a single flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; cells may also become spheric under adverse conditions; they are motile with a corkscrewlike motion and nonsaccharolytic. The type species is Campylobacter fetus.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

/Cam·py·lo·bac·ter/ (kam´pĭ-lo-bak´ter) a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non–spore-forming, motile, spirally curved rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. C. jeju´ni, C. co´li, and certain subspecies of C. fe´tus can cause gastroenteritis; C. rec´tus is associated with periodontal disease..

Campylobacter

Etymology: Gk, campylos, curved, bakterion, small staff
a genus of bacteria found in the family Spirillaceae. The organisms consist of gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spirally curved motile rods that have a single polar flagellum at either or both ends of the cell. They move in a characteristic coillike motion. The organisms are microaerophiles, requiring little or no oxygen for growth. The type species is C. fetus, which consists of several subspecies that cause human infections, as well as abortion and infertility in cattle. Also called Vibrio fetus.
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Campylobacter

Campylobacter

A genus of gently-curved gram-negative rods that are common zoonotic commensals found in the GI tracts of wild and domesticated animals, and cause 3 types of human disease: enteric–eg, diarrhea, typically by C jejuni, extraintestinal, most often by C fetus, and gastric, due to C pylori, re-classified as Helicobacter pylori; human infections are attributed to contaminated water or food. See Helicobacter pylori.

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved spiral rods with a single polar flagellum at one or both ends of the cell; they are motile with a characteristic corkscrewlike motion.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]
Campylobacter a genus of Gram-negative, flagellate bacteria that cause gut infections; a rare trigger of Guillaine-Barré syndrome

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of bacteria containing gram-negative, nonspore-forming, spiral or S-curved rods.
[G. campylos, curved, + baktron, staff or rod]

Campylobacter

a genus of bacteria, family Spirillaceae, made up of gram-negative, non-spore-forming, motile, comma-shaped rods, which are microaerophilic to anaerobic. Members of the genus were previously classified as Vibrio spp. and many of the diseases caused by these species are still referred to as vibriosis.

Campylobacter coli
a commensal of the gastrointestinal tract of poulty, pigs and humans; can cause enteritis in pigs and humans.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus
causes ovine genital campylobacteriosis and abortion in sheep and cattle.
Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis
causes bovine vibriosis, also known as epizootic bovine infertility.
Campylobacter hyointestinalis, Campylobacter mucosalis
associated with the porcine intestinal adenomatosis complex, proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy, necrotic enteritis.
Campylobacter jejuni
causes abortion in sheep and enteritis in dogs, cats and other animals. An important food-borne cause of enteritis in humans, and the cause of avian vibrionic hepatitis.
Campylobacter sputorum subsp. bubulus, Campylobacter sputorum biovar fecalis
found in cattle and sheep, but not known to cause disease.
Campylobacter upsaliensis
may be associated with diarrhea in dogs and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Brendan Mason, consultant in communicable disease control for Public Health Wales, said: "If you have consumed Penlan y Mor unpasteurised milk any time since 1 June, including at the Royal Welsh Show on Wednesday 26 July, and you are experiencing symptoms of campylobacter infection, we want to hear from you.
Dr Brendan Mason, consultant in communicable disease control for Public Health Wales, said: "If you have consumed Penlan y Mor unpasteurised milk any time since June 1, including at the Royal Welsh Show on Wednesday, July 26, and you are experiencing symptoms of campylobacter infection, we want to hear from you.
Bu calismada, Istanbul'da satisa sunulan pilic eti orneklerinde gida hijyeni acisindan buyuk onem tasiyan termotolerant Campylobacter spp.
A spokeswoman for the supermarket said: "Lidl UK has been actively working in collaboration with its suppliers to reduce the levels of campylobacter in raw chicken.
There are reports on the prevalence of Campylobacter among live birds and animals and different kinds of food from all over the world revealing upon a wide range of results.
Although the association between consuming chicken livers and infection with Campylobacter is well known (9), the underlying reasons for the changing epidemiology of outbreaks associated with chicken liver consumption are unclear.
As part of the Campylobacter Strategy the Ministry is regularly auditing poultry processors, monitoring and assessing new strains of Campylobacter, and monitoring of food products at various points in the food chain.
La combinacion que se pudo observar con mas frecuencia fue la de Campylobacter sp.
The main mechanism of resistance to fluoroquinolones in Campylobacter is a mutation in the quinolone resistance determinant region (QRDR) in the gyrA gene, which codes for the 'A' subunit of the enzyme DNA gyrase, conferring a decreased sensitivity to these antibiotics.
Cooking will kill any bacteria present, including campylobacter.
Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United Kingdom, with more than a quarter of a million cases annually.