cadmium

(redirected from Cadmium chloride)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cadmium

 (Cd) [kad´me-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 48. (See Appendix 6.) Inhalation of cadmium fumes causes pulmonary edema with proliferative interstitial pneumonia and various degrees of lung damage. Cadmium poisoning may occur due to occupational exposure, smoking, and ingestion of certain foods (kidneys and livers; seafoods such as mussels, oysters, and crabs; and some grains). Maternal cadmium exposure can cause abnormal embryonic development by interfering with normal zinc ion metabolic activities.

cad·mi·um (Cd),

(kad'mē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently used in the basic sciences. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

/cad·mi·um/ (Cd) (kad´me-um) a chemical element, at. no. 48. Cadmium and its salts are poisonous; inhalation of cadmium fumes or dust causes pneumoconiosis, and ingestion of foods contaminated by cadmium-plated containers causes violent gastrointestinal symptoms.

cadmium (Cd)

[kad′mē·əm]
(Cd)
Etymology: Gk, kadmeia, zinc ore
, a metallic bluish white element that resembles tin. Its atomic number is 48; its atomic mass is 112.40. Cadmium has many uses in industry and was formerly included in medications. Such medications have been replaced by less toxic drugs. See also cadmium poisoning.

cadmium

A toxic divalent metallic element (atomic number 48, atomic weight 112.411), which is ubiquitous in nature and central to many industrial processes. Most cadmium is used for rechargeable batteries; it is also used in electroplating, nuclear fission, TV tubes, photocopier drums and paint pigments (yellow and red). It has no known physiologic role in higher animals.

Ref range
0–5.0 µg/L.
 
Toxic range
> 100 µg/L.

cad·mi·um

(Cd) (kad'mē-ŭm)
A metallicelement, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in fields such as metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A poisonous metal sometimes encountered as an air pollutant in industrial processes. Inhaled cadmium dust can cause lung inflammation. Cadmium is also damaging to the kidneys and can cause softening of the bones (OSTEOMALACIA).

cadmium,

n a toxic metal that is found in cigarette smoke, industrial waste, paints, and plastics. Exposure has been linked to cancer, hypertension, and lowered activity of specific enzymes.
cadmium iodatum (kadˑ·mē·m ī·ō·dāˑ·tm),
n a homeopathic preparation of cadmium used to alleviate the symptoms associated with radiation treatments.
cadmium sulphuricum (kadˑ·mē·m sl·fyurˑ·i·km),
n a homeopathic preparation of cadmium used to alleviate facial paralysis, Bell's palsy, nausea, vomiting, and the symptoms associated with chemotherapy.

cad·mi·um

(kad'mē-ŭm)
Metallic element; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently employed in the basic sciences.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium (Cd) (kad´mēəm),

n a bluish-white metallic element that resembles tin. Cadmium bromide, used in engraving, lithography, and photography, can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested.

cadmium

chemical element, atomic number 48, symbol Cd; its salts are poisonous. See Table 6. Poisoning in animals may be caused by aerial pollution of pastures or by accidental ingestion of fungicides or anthelmintics which contain the element. Nephropathy, anemia, bone demineralization and poor hair, skin and hoof growth result.

cadmium anthranilate
no longer widely used as an anthelmintic for pigs because of its toxicity.
cadmium chloride
causes bleaching of teeth, anemia, cardiac hypertrophy and bone marrow hyperplasia.
cadmium oxide
a toxic compound used at one time as an anthelmintic for pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
In present work, the histopathological consequences of high dose of cadmium chloride (0.
It appears that anemia is secondary to the possible accelerated hemolysis, hemorrhage and/or reduced erythropoiesis, inflicted by cadmium, indicated that previous studies showed that cadmium chloride caused changes in the hematological indices of carps [55].
Ogawa observed damage to blood capillaries in the testes, leading to testicular hemorrhage, loss of continuity of germinal epithelium and interstitial fibrosis in mice with a high dose of cadmium chloride (10 mg/kg).
Comparison of renal toxicity after long-term oral administration of cadmium chloride and cadmium-metallothionein in rats.
In our laboratory, an experimental model of cadmium-induced Fanconi syndrome was achieved by repetitive intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride in adult rats (42-44).
Moreover, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene, a cellular target for toxicity and death caused by exposure to cadmium chloride (Othumpangat et al.
2002) observed a decline in liver and ovarian proteins of Notopterus notopterus after exposure to various concentrations of cadmium chloride and mercuric chloride, individually and in combination, for 2 months.
The objective therefore, was (1) to evaluate PFT-[alpha] for differential cellular protection in response to arsenic trioxide and cadmium chloride exposure of normal and neoplastic cells, and (2) to evaluate the transcriptional activation of p53 and p53-responsive genes in rat liver cells and HepG2 carcinoma cell line.
The team exposed the chip-mounted cells to one of two toxins, cadmium chloride or acetaminophen.